MB Truck Exhaust Route

#1
Hey all, we just picked up our "new" 1120 AF and I have a question about the exhaust. Ours is equipped with stack with one of those flappers at the top to keep rain out. I want to switch is out to one that exits below the truck and was wondering how it is normally done in these trucks.
 
#3
as far as I know merc trucks today are only offered with two options, a short dump pipe out of the silencer, or a connection (offered in a few places) on the silencer for fitting an exhaust of your choosing.
 
#4
Thanks Nick, one ours after the silencer there is a flex pipe, which then turns 180 degrees to just behind the cab. Then then stack with the flapper at the top. I'll switch to the dump pipe you mentioned.
 
#5
Hiya
Can I be nosey and ask why?
The only reason I'd thought of to not roof exit is soot on the solar panels.
But a low down exit annoys people we parked next to on morning start up, and was less than cool when using the truck air supply to air up again.
Maybe your truck doesn't smoke much?
:)
 
#6
Hiya
Can I be nosey and ask why?
The only reason I'd thought of to not roof exit is soot on the solar panels.
But a low down exit annoys people we parked next to on morning start up, and was less than cool when using the truck air supply to air up again.
Maybe your truck doesn't smoke much?
:)
ha !!
My oldschool OM366A seriously whitesmokes when cold. Its rightly embarassing. I would like to change to a stack exhaust to not smoke everybody.
 
#7
Guess I'll do a bit more thinking on it but the stack will cause the box to have to be set back a bit farther. I have planned on using a TC box and I would suspect I would need to protect the fiberglass wall a bit from the heat. Also, while at idle the flapper clanks. We have had possession of the truck a few days, in Florida so no cold starts. I have also been the one to drive it so I do not see the smoke. The engine does seem to run pretty well though. It has the OM366LA so a similar engine.
 

Neil

Observer
#8
My exhaust originally nearly went the length of the chassis then exited via a snaking pipe that fed over the rear axle and out to the side. I have modified it and it now goes to one silencer mid way and then exits via a very small downward turning pipe to the floor.

The best thing i did was spend time re sealing all the joints on the air system. It now holds useable pressure for about a week. This means that when i am parked on a camp site on a cold day i can start the engine and get the brakes of immediately and get out before the neighbours either want to kill me or they drift into a deep sleep from the embarrasing amount of white smoke it produces on a cold start up.

One of the problems i have heard of with vertical stacks is that if you run the engine and have left any roof vents open you can quickly fill the cabin with nasty fumes.

On a different not congratulations on getting it home. Exciting times ahead. Are you doing a blog of the build. And dont forget to as those questions. We all had them.

Good luck

Neil

Www.cloud9ontour.com
Www.cloud9isborn.blogspot.com
 
#9
our exhaust exits in front of the rear axle.
Start up smoke can be eliminated by running the Webasto engine preheat for a few minutes.
Neil, holding air pressure for a week is outstanding!
Jon, have a good look at Neil's layout, I think it is one of the nicest I've seen.
 
#10
Sorry, when I said air up I meant the tyres. All four would easily take an hour from sand driving soft psi, the left rear had the exhaust outlet aiming straight at you. An attachment that actually clipped on to and stayed on the valve without me holding it would have been very welcome. Any suggestions?!?
Our upcoming truck should have loads of battery capacity, so I have a 24v Viair to preserve my lungs a little.
Preheating where possible is a good idea though.
A pair of roof level exhausts means you can hardly tell this truck is running at all!

 
#11
Sorry, when I said air up I meant the tyres. All four would easily take an hour from sand driving soft psi, the left rear had the exhaust outlet aiming straight at you. An attachment that actually clipped on to and stayed on the valve without me holding it would have been very welcome. Any suggestions?!?
Our upcoming truck should have loads of battery capacity, so I have a 24v Viair to preserve my lungs a little.
Preheating where possible is a good idea though.
A pair of roof level exhausts means you can hardly tell this truck is running at all!

Great video !
Now envision how awful that smokescreen coming out at groundlevel.
Better yet, were his pipes straight up, even less smoke lingers down at people level.
 
#12
Joe thanks for the compliment.

Yes it now holds for about 5 to 7 days if we leave it at full 8 bar. Before I couldn't get 24 hours. Its made a big difference .

Neil
 
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#13
Will add checking the air system to the project list. I have a Webasto waiting for a habitat to be installed. I will be removing the stack for now, I really do not want to move the habitat back to allow the spacing for it.

Finished unbolting and de-wiring the firebox today, removing lights, fixing door locks and stating to repair the plastic grill (it is cracked so using some epoxy, fiberlgass and filler). Have some guys lined up to pull the box off tomorrow morning. Going to try and line up a sand blaster to hit the chassis before the subframe is built (hopefully early next week). Also getting the body ready to paint white and have an aluminum roof rack built (mainly for off road lights). Will be a busy next couple of weeks.

OK, here is another question. I am trying to figure out how to operate the engine brake. Apparently there is a specific one for Swedish/Norwegian trucks. There is a knob on the right just below the steering wheel. Does not seem to move, I sort of assumed you would push down on it. Any thoughts?

And another one, the parking brake seems reluctant to disengage. I also assumed that I would put my foot on the brake pedal and pull out and lift the parking brake lever (air pressure is reading ok on the guage). Seems to take a few tries to get it to disengage.

And Cloud 9 is one of my favorite builds, mainly for the attention to the details. I hope to emulate a lot of their ideas.
 

Sitec

Adventurer
#14
Be very careful using a sand blaster around the plastic air lines and fittings... as it does not take much to mark/hole an air line with high pressure sand. A steam cleaner and the right degreaser gets most of the grime and loose paint off.. :)
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
#15
... Neil, holding air pressure for a week is outstanding!
Amen!

Jon, have a good look at Neil's layout, I think it is one of the nicest I've seen.
Agreed. Had I seen Cloud 9 before our truck was built, I would have gone with hydronic heat/hot water, if only for engine preheat. Now, if I can ever find an Espar dealer to tell me which bits to buy, we are going to fit an engine preheat. Beloved Spouse is REALLY embarrassed by the clouds of white fog we produce when the temperature is below freezing! :-(