Medical Kit Containers: Bag vs Hard Case

Pacific Northwest yetti

Expedition Medic
I'm wondering what the purpose of carrying BP cuffs/O2 monitors and the like are for some? If you're in the wilderness far away from help/EMS/hospital what good with diagnostic equipment do with nothing to treat with?
For me, as a licensed medic. And depending on what you are carrying in your kit. I am pretty well stocked, and can treat basic medical, trauma, ortho, drop fluids, dental, sutures. The vitals, HEart rate, O2 sat, BP, Resp rate, etc tell us and allow us to trend how the PT is doing. Giving us a look at the organs and vitals inside prior to them appearing on the outside. From this we can gauge, if the meds have helped, if they need them, is this an EVAC ASAP, (triage) or can we takeout time. Gauging the seriousness of the condition, what stage of shock they may be in. When im taking a large group, ( think remote expedition, long term) I take vitals prior on my team so I know where there baseline is. Most the time, honestly its going to be " clinic, or basic sick call stuff" upset stomach, fever, bites and stings, stuff that can be treated with OTC meds.

Is there a specific condition you are thinking of?
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
I always keep mine in a back pack. Trauma items are kept prestaged in gallon Ziploc bags so I can grab one and go. Everything I need to stop major bleeding or establish an airway fits in the bag.

I have also been a medic for many years, so I do things differently than many on here.
 

Tswhit15

Member
For me, as a licensed medic. And depending on what you are carrying in your kit. I am pretty well stocked, and can treat basic medical, trauma, ortho, drop fluids, dental, sutures. The vitals, HEart rate, O2 sat, BP, Resp rate, etc tell us and allow us to trend how the PT is doing. Giving us a look at the organs and vitals inside prior to them appearing on the outside. From this we can gauge, if the meds have helped, if they need them, is this an EVAC ASAP, (triage) or can we takeout time. Gauging the seriousness of the condition, what stage of shock they may be in. When im taking a large group, ( think remote expedition, long term) I take vitals prior on my team so I know where there baseline is. Most the time, honestly its going to be " clinic, or basic sick call stuff" upset stomach, fever, bites and stings, stuff that can be treated with OTC meds.

Is there a specific condition you are thinking of?
If you're working on an expedition with medications and a team then I understand that. For insurance purposes they probably require that you carry all that equipment on a long term expedition. I'm talking more overlanding where it's not your job, and you don't have access to cardiac meds and oxygen. The average joe, even trained, cannot get his hands on IV fluids even. In my opinion. As an emergency room RN and former EMT
 

Pacific Northwest yetti

Expedition Medic
If they need Cardiac meds, and your not close to definitive care. Your most likely going to lose them anyway...

as an RN, im sure you are familiar with the value of a base line set of vitals. Even just HR and Reparations, I was simply answering the question you had posted. If you dont have the training, or knowledge, or level of comfort and are unwilling to do so..then dont. You are correct unless your medical director signs off on you purchasing them. As a " civilian" anything other than OTC can be hard to come by.

The majority of things encountered in the back country setting can be treated OTC, and preventive. What goes into mine differs if im on a contract job or not, that is true. If im not on a contract, I pull the majority of anything above the EMT-B level.
 
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