My Solo Wanderings of the West

Leaving Petrolia I headed south through the hills of the Lost Coast. I had planned to go just a few miles to another BLM campsite near the tiny community of Honeydew, but the area's main industry was becoming way too obvious. Being harvest time, crowds of “trimmigrants” invade the area looking for work trimming the harvested bud. People migrate from all over, even from outside the US, to the area looking for the lucrative work but only a few succeed in finding jobs. The few sites at Honeydew campground were taken over with dozens of tents of hopeful trimmigrants. The town was packed with vehicles at the little general store.




And continuing the route south, mile after mile of the lovely road was lined with fencing and the telltale smell of the grow operations.




I ended up all the way down at Shelter Cove. The road makes a long descent from the mountains down to the quiet resort community. Shelter Cove has a marina but without docks, boats are stored on dry land. Tractors haul boats down a hill to this cove where they are launched.




A view from one of the many overlooks along the town's shoreline.




Looking north from the north edge of Shelter Cove at the King Range. Hikers from Mattole Beach exit the Lost Coast Trail here, most taking 4 days for the difficult beach hike.




Back up the mountain from Shelter Cove I turned down this road to stay at one of the BLM campgrounds in the southern end of the King Range.



There's a lot more to see of the Lost Coast; the Sinkyone Widerness continues south from Shelter Cove Road. But it was time for me to get moving and the next day I headed back to the 101.

That's all for this update, thanks for following!
 
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We explored the Lost Coast in our Land Cruiser a few years back in the fall. Awesome place but yeah you have to be careful of the grow operations. Love catching up on your thread. This was bummer in with all fires we had in the NW.
 
That is some stunning country,thanks for the great pictures and commentary.
Now that MJ is legal in CA I have been catching a whiff of the crop as I drive around this fall.
I was in Takilma OR in the 70's,I didn't know about growing before my backpacking trip in the area.There were no trespassing signs all over,one had a skull and cross bones.I stopped in a gas station/store,they must of had every rolling paper made....the guy working the counter was looking at me like my truck said DEA on the side! I filled the tank and got out of Dodge.
 
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That is a beutifull area that I would like to see. It's to bad it's being ruined by growing drugs. Sadly, I think the whole west coast is going this way. i was in CO a couple years ago, it was terrible in some of the towns. It's sad.
 
Thank you for sharing, i have now also added " the lost coast" to my google maps to visit list.

I will add, as far as horses go. A string, or team usually refers to horses being worked. String, is in reference to a pack string of mules or horses, tailed together. And Team refers to the horses hooked up and pulling a wagon, plow, etc. Remuda, is a term for broke horses that could be ridden/worked. Herd usually refers to horses in a group that are wild. In short herd or remuda is accurate. I've spent the majority of my life in the company of animals, livestock, and exoctic alike.

I like the " zeal " of zebras as i was only familiar with the term " dazzle" of zebras. ( I spent quite some time seeing an exotic animal trainer, she introduced me to many a critter, although her speciality was Elephants)

Thank you for sharing for those of use who are in between travels, or unable to do so. Happy trails
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
I have family on the North Coast. The economic impact of growing legally has been a good thing from a employment stand point. The fishery biz has been in decline as is the lumber biz. The new biz is Not so good from a affordable home stand point given the Grow boom has pushed property values up.

The major negative that has grown in CA are the illegal grows conducted on public and private lands without approval using stolen water and banned pesticides, varmit poisons and illegal out of season hunting etc.
 
Hi Kenny,

I've made it all the way through and like everyone else, wait for new posts so we can travel along. One day I'm just going to sell all my junk and hit the road, so I had a few questions.

You stay in some fairly remote spots, ever have any troubles? Do you get lonely or do you get enough interaction with whoever is around? What do you do as far as receiving mail and paying bills? Ever wish you had a different setup? A 4x4 and a teardrop trailer? A roof top tent? A small towable RV? A small motor home towing a 4x4? What do you like and not like about your setup? Did you initially budget enough $ to have fun or do you find yourself having to watch the money? Not to get too personal, but what would a guy have to have for monthly income to do what you're doing?

Thanks Kenny, enjoying following along, even if I'm a little jealous. Live to the fullest and stay safe.
 
Wow, a lot of responses to that last update!

We explored the Lost Coast in our Land Cruiser a few years back in the fall. Awesome place but yeah you have to be careful of the grow operations. Love catching up on your thread. This was bummer in with all fires we had in the NW.
I just happened to see your trip report on the Lost Coast, very cool. Now I really wished I took longer to go into the Sinkyone area. Thanks for following!


That is some stunning country,thanks for the great pictures and commentary.
Now that MJ is legal in CA I have been catching a whiff of the crop as I drive around this fall.
I was in Takilma OR in the 70's,I didn't know about growing before my backpacking trip in the area.There were no trespassing signs all over,one had a skull and cross bones.I stopped in a gas station/store,they must of had every rolling paper made....the guy working the counter was looking at me like my truck said DEA on the side! I filled the tank and got out of Dodge.
That is a beutifull area that I would like to see. It's to bad it's being ruined by growing drugs. Sadly, I think the whole west coast is going this way. i was in CO a couple years ago, it was terrible in some of the towns. It's sad.
I was out riding the bike outside of Petrolia when I found a rare cell phone signal so I pulled over by a farm field to check messages; in a few minutes a mean looking dude in a Blazer with a mean looking Rottweiler pulled up alongside and gave me the stink-eye. I thought it best to just move along. A few other times I felt like the “stranger in town”.


Thank you for sharing, i have now also added " the lost coast" to my google maps to visit list.

I will add, as far as horses go. A string, or team usually refers to horses being worked. String, is in reference to a pack string of mules or horses, tailed together. And Team refers to the horses hooked up and pulling a wagon, plow, etc. Remuda, is a term for broke horses that could be ridden/worked. Herd usually refers to horses in a group that are wild. In short herd or remuda is accurate. I've spent the majority of my life in the company of animals, livestock, and exoctic alike.

I like the " zeal " of zebras as i was only familiar with the term " dazzle" of zebras. ( I spent quite some time seeing an exotic animal trainer, she introduced me to many a critter, although her speciality was Elephants)

Thank you for sharing for those of use who are in between travels, or unable to do so. Happy trails
I thought since the horses were pastured and not wild that herd wouldn't fit. I realized they probably weren't a team, but I liked “string” because it reminded of the Honeymooners bit with Ed Norton about “a string of poloponies”. :)
Reading some more I think you nailed it with “remuda”.
But I mostly brought it up so I could write about the “zeal” of zebras, lol. Although “dazzle” is pretty good too!
Fun stuff! Thanks for following.
A String of Poloponies:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbJNyGbFNRo
 
I have family on the North Coast. The economic impact of growing legally has been a good thing from a employment stand point. The fishery biz has been in decline as is the lumber biz. The new biz is Not so good from a affordable home stand point given the Grow boom has pushed property values up.

The major negative that has grown in CA are the illegal grows conducted on public and private lands without approval using stolen water and banned pesticides, varmit poisons and illegal out of season hunting etc.
Well said. Back to you kennyj, thanks for the fine thread. Much enjoyed.
It's all kind of fascinating to a midwesterner. I don't think I'm in a position to judge either way but I do think the grow operations and culture have spoiled a lot of the loveliness of that amazing area. I'm sure it's a boost to the local economy but there are many adverse effects; I talked to one Garberville native who lamented the negative impact on her home-place, especially in the last 5 years. I did find that after a few days in a campsite that reeked from a nearby grow that I was sick of the smell!


Hi Kenny,

I've made it all the way through and like everyone else, wait for new posts so we can travel along. One day I'm just going to sell all my junk and hit the road, so I had a few questions.

You stay in some fairly remote spots, ever have any troubles? Do you get lonely or do you get enough interaction with whoever is around? What do you do as far as receiving mail and paying bills? Ever wish you had a different setup? A 4x4 and a teardrop trailer? A roof top tent? A small towable RV? A small motor home towing a 4x4? What do you like and not like about your setup? Did you initially budget enough $ to have fun or do you find yourself having to watch the money? Not to get too personal, but what would a guy have to have for monthly income to do what you're doing?

Thanks Kenny, enjoying following along, even if I'm a little jealous. Live to the fullest and stay safe.
Wow, that's a lot of questions! Let me post my next update then I'll come back and try to answer some. Thanks for following!


Another great update. Thank you, Kenny
Thanks, justBill.


so. many. beautiful campsites.
So true!!!
 
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Leaving the Lost Coast area, Shelter Cove Road is a long and winding road out to Redway and then Garberville and US 101, some of it through stands of old-growth redwoods.




I followed 101 south, past tourist attractions like the Drive-Through-Tree and the One-Log-House and the “World Famous” Confusion Hill, home of the Chipalope! At Leggett I turned to pick up CA 1 and after another winding route through the coastal mountains I emerged on another beautiful stretch of ocean highway.







I went as far as a free boondocking site right on the ocean.




No beach there, it was rocky bluffs down to the wild surf, but what amazing views!




I hoped for a dramatic sunset but clouds moved in on the horizon and made for this peaceful scene. It was my last night on the coast and it was great to go to sleep to the sound of the nearby surf.

 
The next morning was rainy and foggy. I continued south on CA 1 to Mendocino.




I spent some time looking around but it is pretty much a typical tourist town. The views from town overlooking the ocean are really beautiful, even here in the fog.

Sometime I would like to continue traveling the coast road south but I wanted to start heading inland toward the Sierras, so I backtracked to Fort Bragg and CA route 20.




CA 20 would take me all the way to the Sierras and looked like it might be a fun route. I turned east from Fort Bragg and headed inland, over the coast range to Willits, then south to Ukiah to resupply, then east again to Upper Lake where i headed into the Mendocino National Forest for a night at a quiet FS campground.




The next day was a beautiful drive, with CA 20 hugging the north shore of Clear Lake. I stopped at a lot of turnouts and lakefront town parks.




The highway departed Clear Lake and headed into some wild hill country in the Rocky Creek/Cache Creek BLM area. I stopped for a night at Cowboy Camp, a BLM equestrian camp. It was a beautiful spot and nearly deserted on a weekday, but the flies at that horse camp were the worst I’ve ever experienced!

 
The next day I continued east across CA 20, dropping down through the central valley, through Williams and Colusa, then to Yuba City and on to the foothills. At Nevada City I headed into the hills, crossing the South Yuba river then climbing up to a mountain campground near Malakoff Diggings State Park.




The campground was a beautiful, recently remodeled BLM site. I spent a weekend there, relaxing and exploring the area on the bike.




From Nevada City I had hoped to head to the Lake Tahoe area, but overnight temperatures were forecast to be much colder than I like. Another area that I have wanted to visit, just west of Tahoe, had great weather forecast so I headed to the Crystal Basin area in the Eldorado National Forest. I found a dispersed spot to camp on the side of a mountain with an incredible view across the valley to granite dome mountains in the distance.



 
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