Need help on picking a 3/4 ton

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
This will be the most bang for the buck. Those older trucks, especially 250s and diesels just don't have the payload.
https://www.carsforsale.com/vehicle/details/50423604
Besides the listing incorrectly claiming it is a 6.8L, thats a great truck, and is priced decent.

I picked up my 2011 F250 6.2 gasser.... XLT, extended cab, long bed, 4x4 w/e-locker, with about the same mileage for about the same price.
Just about 115k miles, and paid $16k cash for it at a small dealer that picked it up, along with a few other near identical trucks that were fleet trucks.

They are incredible trucks, with serious payload.
Overbuilt drivetrain, great brakes, comfortable, and reliable.

And dont feel like you have to travel far. The deals are out there.
Just have a good idea of what you are after, have cash in hand, keep eyes open, and be ready to buy.
I did just that with mine, and I literally had it in my driveway less than 18 hours after it hit craigslist on a friday night.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
Also, being one that is transitioning from an older 7.3 truck to a newer 6.2 gasser...

The trucks could not be any more different. Both 3/4 ton Fords, and both tough as nails, sure.
But the newer junk is LIGHTYEARS ahead of the old junk, in refinement, capacity, safety, comfort, etc...

The old Powerstroke is/was a great truck. But I wont miss it at all.

 

Buddha.

Lurker
Besides the listing incorrectly claiming it is a 6.8L, thats a great truck, and is priced decent.

I picked up my 2011 F250 6.2 gasser.... XLT, extended cab, long bed, 4x4 w/e-locker, with about the same mileage for about the same price.
Just about 115k miles, and paid $16k cash for it at a small dealer that picked it up, along with a few other near identical trucks that were fleet trucks.

They are incredible trucks, with serious payload.
Overbuilt drivetrain, great brakes, comfortable, and reliable.

And dont feel like you have to travel far. The deals are out there.
Just have a good idea of what you are after, have cash in hand, keep eyes open, and be ready to buy.
I did just that with mine, and I literally had it in my driveway less than 18 hours after it hit craigslist on a friday night.
6.8 ft bed, not engine size.
 

Chorky

Observer
My .02. A gasser has it's perks for sure, but it's lighter for a reason. I think the tradeoff of having a gasser is a higher payload, but at the cost of making the engine work a lot harder. I recently had to come to terms with just being ok being slightly over weight knowing that the parts are certainly capable within reason. Personally, I wouldn't want a gas engine in a big truck knowing it would be heavy with a purpose of towing/hauling, even if its only hauling a camper. Aside from the added electronics. As mentioned by others, 90's fords flex a ton. Theres a reason for it though I have come to believe. But if you plan things right and do the right mods then it can be mitigated and there wont' be worry for frame damage even with a super heavy load. I plan to be right at 10K or more, still with good off highway performances relative to a full size truck. Also remember, a full size truck is just that. Fat and heavy. . Some new research and development has led to manufacturers considering going back to C-channel frames in the future even.

I love my '97 7.3. The only thing I would consider doing different would be a extended cab vs a crew cab. I am making some very significant alterations to alleviate excess flex stress on the body and frame for future camper solutions. You can find a very high quality 7.3 for under 10K. But you must be willing to expand search radius, and wait for the right moment, and be willing to pay cash when the right truck comes along like Idasho said. I saw many pigs with previous owners who straight up lied about many things. Also, whatever vehicle/engine combo you decide on, make sure you understand at the least the most common failures and problems with it.

And to be fair, I don't know the newer vehicles well, so certainly am partial and biased toward 10th gen and older Ford's, and 12v Dodge's. My dad just got a brand new 3500, and it certainly is amazing, super quiet for a new diesel - but personally, for a person that spends significant amount of time off highway in rural areas, I wouldn't want a newer truck, or a gas engine.


I think one last thing to consider also is the financial side of things. Something many don't really discuss. Unless your a rich person with un-ending income, you probably don't have the luxury to build a cool truck now, then turn around and get a new/different rig in 10 years... So consider spending as much research time as your able to get it right the first time. I know for myself, a newer truck plus all the extras is not possible, and probably never will be. Which is another reason I ended up with a 9th gen Ford, aside from wanting that one specifically anyway.

The old Powerstroke is/was a great truck. But I wont miss it at all.
Could you expand on this some? I would like to hear for sure, might be good for the OP too? I'm unfamiliar with the differences in axles/brakes in newer trucks, and assume many others are as well.
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Nothing wrong with preferring the older trucks.

But a 6.2 can roll with the 7.3 perfectly well. It just downshifts to a higher rpm to do so. Great engine. The only time it feels labored is if you let the trans up shift too much. Operator error.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
Could you expand on this some? I would like to hear for sure, might be good for the OP too? I'm unfamiliar with the differences in axles/brakes in newer trucks, and assume many others are as well.
2006+ super duty gets the "super" Dana 60 front axle, which absolutely dwarfs a standard Dana 60.
I did a solid axle swap in my '96 years ago, going to a king-pin D60. The axle in the old truck looks like a toy in comparison to the Super 60

Rear axles... Old junk has a Sterling 10.25 rear, with a limited slip (all but worn out now)
Rear in the new truck has a Sterling 10.5, complete with E-locker (stock)

Brakes are a tremendous improvement as well. Old truck felt like you needed to toss an anchor overboard to stop :ROFLMAO:
Small front discs, and rear drums. Even running the hottest pads available, brakes are not very good.
New truck has monster 4-wheel discs that will stick your nose to the windshield on command.


That's the basics for axles and brakes, between the "OBS" 7.3 and a 2006+ super duty.
There are boat loads of other differences (improvements) as well.
Hell, even the frame itself is thicker and improved on the new truck.

I never thought Ford would EVER change that :p
 

zooroadbaja

Adventurer
So much info I don’t even know what to get now haha I thought I had it narrowed down but feel like there’s even more options now. Sounds like the ram is out of the picture.

As far as the trucks mentioned does anyone have a break down on what to look for maintenance common problems for the
7.3 Ford
6.2 Ford
 

Bama67

New member
New member but have significant experience with 6.2, my personal truck is a 2018+ 6.2 CCLB and drove many for work in West Texas.
As far as I know the 6.2 is as stone reliable as an engine gets. Many of ours were rode hard and put up wet for 250k+ miles and idled ALL DAY LONG, every day, with no issues.

Flatbed ED on another forum hauled heavy with his for 400,000+ miles before the camshaft hardened coating wore off. He just threw a re-man 6.2 in and is still trucking, over 600k now I believe still on original tranny. Bad ass engine. I live at 9,400 and never slow down on steep passes, just down shift and let er eat.
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
I get 15mpg on the highway with rolling hills, traffic, and 75-80mph. 17 is possible if I have the highway to myself. City mileage is 1mpg. My work truck reads 8-9mpg all the time, and it idles for half a day.

I don't know of any cam phaser nightmares with the 6.2L like the 5.4L. But they're still there. They're still noisy, especially in the winter. And they'll have to be replaced eventually with the timing chains and tensioners. They are a completely different design though. Should be tougher.

There was a batch of 6.2's with bad lifters, or springs. They'd drop a valve immediately after the 80,000 mile warranty expired. Most could be fixed easy enough. But our fleet trucks that had that issue had long blocks replaced. I blame a lazy dealership, and maybe my office "wanted" the new Fords to fail. So they didn't ask for bore pics or anything. Many owners just put a new valve, rocker, and spring in, and were good to go.
 
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deserteagle56

Adventurer
New member but have significant experience with 6.2, my personal truck is a 2018+ 6.2 CCLB and drove many for work in West Texas.
As far as I know the 6.2 is as stone reliable as an engine gets. Many of ours were rode hard and put up wet for 250k+ miles and idled ALL DAY LONG, every day, with no issues.

Flatbed ED on another forum hauled heavy with his for 400,000+ miles before the camshaft hardened coating wore off. He just threw a re-man 6.2 in and is still trucking, over 600k now I believe still on original tranny. Bad ass engine. I live at 9,400 and never slow down on steep passes, just down shift and let er eat.
^This. I worked for a huge mining company for many years and they had literally hundreds of F250 and F350 Superduties. The later 5.4 V8 and 6.8 V10 engines, as well as the newer 6.2 gas engines were pretty much bulletproof. It used to amaze me to see how many of them made it to 300,000 and even 400,000 miles without any major problems...especially knowing how many of them were treated.
 
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