New Conqueror Basecamp Owner

backinthelab

New member
Willie, the bulkhead fittings actually face the front of the trailer, here's a pic of the tanks right after I removed them...
IMG_0998.jpg

I replaced those two valves with quick-connects...
IMG_1006.jpg

Those brass barb fittings on the top of the tank are to prevent airlock. I replaced the stock tubing that ran to these with new and it helped tremendously. This shows two peices of new hose with one old still connected, the new pieces are much more robust...
IMG_1011.jpg

I still have to get under the trailer and shoot a few pics, spent the majority of last night making cables for the solar panel and water pump. Will be hooking it up today, then throwing it on the road for the weekend!:smiley_drive:
 

FFMessick

New member
That looks GREAT. How far down are the fill tubes extending into the tank. I have some issues when I try and use the supplied water pump, it wont drop into the tank far enough to draw water. I like your water pump set up. Keep the pics coming.
 

backinthelab

New member
That looks GREAT. How far down are the fill tubes extending into the tank. I have some issues when I try and use the supplied water pump, it wont drop into the tank far enough to draw water. I like your water pump set up. Keep the pics coming.
The fill tubes actually fit to the outside of the tank inlets and are secured by hose clamps. I had the same issue trying to drop the "OEM" pump down the tube, it just wouldn't fall all the way in. After removing the tanks, it is apparent that the inside of tank inlets were shaved down at some point, most likely by the importer when they assembled them. I took a heat gun to the inside to melt off all of the scrapings but haven't tried the drop-in pump since. Even though the tanks are a PITA to remove, I would recommend doing it for maintenance purposes at the least. Personally, aside from wanting to make improvements, I was apprehensive of drinking water from a tank that I couldn't visually inspect for cleanliness/debris!

Regarding the mounting system, I'll take a pic tonight an post it up, but here's a list of the materials I used in the meantime:
(8) .38" HHMB, 8" long
(8) .38" thread connectors
(8) .38" nuts
(16) .38" washers
(8) .38" locknuts
(1) .13 X 1.5 X 36" galv HRS
(1) .13 X 1 X 36" perforated galv HRS (garage door install strapping)
(8) pieces of .38" ID hose (left over from replacement of air release hoses)

Tested out the Basecamp this weekend, everything functioned wonderfully! Also, with it dumping rain on us all day, I found a couple areas that I can improve, mainly the water run-off from the tent to the kitchen area. It was quite annoying having continual drops falling on our breakfast, so I think if I cut a tarp to fit that area I can divert the water elsewhere. Not a huge deal, I just figure that they don't get rainfall in SA like we do here in the Midwest!

Currently, I'm trying to figure out how to install these solar panels. There's one big issue installing them on the "roof", in that, when the tent is deployed they'll be facing the ground. My thought is to store the larger, 120W panel in the table storage area when not needed and just make a ground stand for it.

However, I'd like to take the smaller 100W panel and mount it to the top rack. I would fabricate a pivoting mount so that I can swing it forward, over the nose box, when the tent is deployed. Then, swing it back over the "roof" when traveling to get a charge when on the road. Does anyone have any suggestions/thoughts on a better way this can be accomplished?
 

backinthelab

New member
Kinda hard to see, but I used the perforated HRS to hang the .38 bolts, then used the 1.5" HRS to run under the tanks. This allows me to adjust/remove the tanks much easier. Let me know if you have any questions, the pic isn't of great quality...
IMG_1027.jpg
 

backinthelab

New member
Latest update: Solar panel mount almost complete!

Okay, so I've been racking my brain over this for some time and finally decided to start putting together the initial concept and tweaking as I go. I wanted a panel mounted on the top of the trailer to charge while in motion. The issue comes into play when the tent is deployed, as the panel would then be facing the ground. In addition, I had concerns about flipping the rack open/closed and the potential damage that could occur to the panel. So, I needed to accomplish a few things for this work:
1) The mount could not be permanently attached to the top half of the rack
2) It must be able to swivel out of the way of the rack when opening/closing
3) It must be rigid enough for trail conditions, yet must also contain some level of shock absorption to protect the glass on the panel
4) Lastly, it needs to be adjustable, not only pivoting horizontally over the trailer but also allow vertical tilt of the panel to face the sun

At this point, it seems that all four criteria have been meet, sans any actual road tests. I still need to figure out some adjustable stabilizing mounts when it's in the "mobile" position to allow for the panel to be secured in an angled or horizontal position. When complete, I will disassemble and paint the whole assembly.

Here's what I came up with, your comments/suggestions are appreciated:
IMG_1034.jpg
 

backinthelab

New member
Almost a year in review, maybe I should wait a couple of weeks to post this. ;-)

Well, aside from a few things that would take a lot of time and money to do (like sandblasting and painting the entire exterior) the Basecamp is complete with all of the upgrades that I could want or need. Not only a great way to explore, but also a spectacular rig for survival! I've been out with it about a dozen times thus far and it's exceeded all expectations. Plus, every time I take it out, I look for areas of improvement. It's getting harder to find those now! Here's the list of work I've put into it the far:

As previously mentioned, cleaned/refitted the water tanks and installed solar.

Power:
1000w sinewave inverter
(2) 120ah deep cycle batteries
Solar controller
230w solar panel (stored where metal table used to be)
100w solar panel and adjustable mount on roof
Rewired the hitch plug so it works with the JK
Added rope lights to rear for nighttime cooking
Installed Toad Charger

Food and Hygiene:
ARB fridge
New slides on fridge slide, rotated it 180-degrees
Installed water pump with inlet/outlets on nose box
Added hookup for hot water heater

Functional/Cosmetic:
Sanded and recoated underbody, inside of nose cone, and tailgate
Greased braking system and hitch
Replaced running lights with LED's
Added propane tanks
Sealed tent with Canvak and replaced plastic zip ties with stainless
Refinished latches
Added hylift jack

So far, so good, as soon as it gets above 30 here I'll pull her out of the garage and post some pics! This year it's time to do some more difficult trail-testing. I'll report back soon!
 

fullofdays

Adventurer
Nice. I just picked up a hardly used conquerer conquest and have a bit of work to do with the water system and am even considering adding a fuel cell for off grid camping.
 

Aspen Trails Trailers

Supporting Sponsor
In honesty, there really is not a reason for them on top during travel, as the battery should be kept up to snuff with the vehicle's charging system. 1 10 gauge wire and your good to go. I also do not like them on the roof, as it forces you to camp in full sun to take advantage of the solar panel. Nice place for transport, out of the way, but I like being in the shade if possible. Mine are in the cabin, removed when needed, safe from tree limbs, hail and thieves.

Paul congrats on the trailer, glad you found what you wanted. Sorry our plan just did not pan out. Still working on it though. I may have pricing for the EFOY Monday.

Bob

www.aspenXtrails.com
 

fullofdays

Adventurer
Just purchased a conquest from another expo member myself. What did you do to rewire the 7spade to function with the 4 pin on your JK?
 

backinthelab

New member
Warning: ancient thread revival! Back again and still a Base Camp owner two years and counting. Aside from some trips last year, the trailer has been in the garage and only moved a few times for maintenance and to ensure the tires don't get flat spots. Disappointing that I haven't been able to get out, but I do have a good excuse since we celebrated the birth of our first baby girl last Sept. So, coupled with an extemely short summer, there haven't been many opportunities to get out.

My wife and I were out last summer for 4 days in Tennessee. The one 120w solar panel provided all the power we needed and more. We ran the fridge the whole time, had a radio playing, hot showers every morning, and had more than enough lighting in the evenings. The 230w panel never came out, so I'm very happy that this setup worked so well!

That said, there's still work to be done. We just began our polyurea operations at my shop, so you know what that means! I understand the "cooling" concept of the white paint, but a flat-black polyurea coating will be more incognito when out in the woods and tough as nails. There's a ton of disassembly to be done to accomplish this, however, so it'll most likely be an all-winter project given my lack of time.

Aside from the coating, I'm really rethinking the rooftop tent. That whole assembly is heavy and deploying it can be a back-breaker. I'm contemplating removal of the top half and fabricating either a lighter clamshell design or some sort of pull-out platform (haven't thought the specifics of that one out yet). I'd really like to run a different tent but can't throw that kind of money at it right now.

To answer some of the above posts....regarding the solar, I also prefer to park in the shade. I understand the concerns about damage to the panel, however, I've had branches whipping by and it's come out without a scratch. In addition, the 230w panel can be deployed up to 50' away when needed.

fullofdays, you probably already figured this out, but if you haven't please PM me and I'll shoot you over the diagram. The only thing that isn't running throught the Base Camps plug is the charging line, which was reserved for the Toad Charge. Unfortunately, I had a nearly-catastrophic event when the plug end of the Toad Charger on the JK shorted, caught on fire, and nearly took the Jeep with it. The "breaker" that they provide never switched, so I won't be using their products again.

Anyways, that's all for now. Stay tuned as I make it a blacked-out Base Camp, and happy trails in the meantime.
 
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