New for 2022? GXV and EarthCruiser hints

Steve_382

Active member
Here’s what I think is going to happen. Storyteller‘s business model is to sell a four vehicle line of vans though a nationwide network of RV dealers. I suspect that GXV’s Missouri facility will be retooled to build a cost sensitive expedition-like vehicle that will be supported by these same RV dealers. I’m going to call it the “Winnebago EKKO killer”. No more one-off custom dream rigs from GXV I’d say.

We shall see what happens!

From the press release:

While the custom Global X and GXV rigs will continue to be built in Springfield, MO; the higher volume, repeat build Adventure Truck units will be built by the Storyteller team in their newly expanded facilities in Birmingham, AL to meet the increasing demand for this type of off-road, off-grid, long range expedition vehicle.
 

BillFitz

New member
From the press release:

While the custom Global X and GXV rigs will continue to be built in Springfield, MO; the higher volume, repeat build Adventure Truck units will be built by the Storyteller team in their newly expanded facilities in Birmingham, AL to meet the increasing demand for this type of off-road, off-grid, long range expedition vehicle.
Any press corporate release is typically drafted using unicorn farts and fairy dust. And to quote Mike Tyson: “Everybody has a plan until they’re punched in the face.” I have no doubt that Storyteller will keep GXV in production in Missouri, AS LONG AS THEY’RE PROFITABLE. We’re in the peak times of the expensive overland vehicle, but once the economy slows or stalls (thanks Joe), wealthy people will stop spending on toys. That will be the test for Storyteller.

Personally, I don’t see the upside for the purchase of GXV unless Storyteller bought it for a song. The risk is crazy high. But hey, I’m no genius. I’m just a run of the mill retired guy.
 
It makes total sense to me. Van Pelts can concentrate on the big rigs and true overland global trucks. Story teller gets a expanded product line to address the US 4x4 RV crowd like me that refuses to own a Mercedes Sprinter chassis for off roading.
GXV expertise in developing the AT transferred to storytellers production could be a huge win win. I'd probably wait and let the new company build 4-5 first for someone else, but I’d buy one for sure. Its our target truck.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
Really wish someone would build a unit along these lines (ie. integrated, composite box, actually useable in the winter) that would seat and sleep four & a dog, and not cost $750k USD. Every unit I see along these lines is only meant for two adults, and is still cramped for even them. Seems a family has no choice but to go the trailer route.
Problem is the fact that the only two truck options for 4 people are the f550 and npr . nothing else can carry a big camper or seat 4 comfortably. This means that these options are already bringing the price well above $200.000 I personally wish for a crew cab transit cab chassis.
 

gregmchugh

Observer
I don't know why those are the only options. The average F350 can be optioned with a dual cab (TONS of room for 4 adults) and a ~3500lb payload (remove the truck bed, and you'll gain another few hundred pounds). There are plenty of trailers that can fit four adults, and that come in similar (and lower) weights, and that's including the frame, axle, suspension, tongue, wheels/tires, and other components that wouldn't be necessary. Seems to be it's a question of coming up with a good layout/design, and being clever about materials used.

Look at the Opus OP15 trailer: queen size bed, dual cots, tons of interior storage, shower, etc., all in a footprint that doesn't seem to be all that big. Put a queen bed over the truck (cabover), make the rear end of the camper slide out like on the Opus, and put two bunks there.

Better yet, copy the design idea from the Bruder EXP-6 and replace the bunks with a couch that turns into cots at night. You've now got your sleeping situation covered, and still have plenty of room left for a toilet stall and an interior kitchen.

There's also the Wingamm Oasi integrated campers that have clever features such as the main bed dropping down from the ceiling (https://www.motor1.com/photo/5867763/wingamm-oasi-540/). Lots of clever designs out there.

Sure, I'll concede that a slide out is not great for sub-freezing temperatures, but it can be done well and not be a deal breaker. My last trailer had a pop-up roof with the gap filled by canvas-like material, and it worked just fine in -15C, so a tiny perimeter gap around a slide out can definitely be made to work.

The point is, you don't need a 30ft box on a firetruck to go on a two-month road trip. Some unconventional design ideas can be incorporated to make a much smaller, much lighter vehicle perfectly useable and practical.
If there was a market for this then don’t you suppose some company would be making them?

You can go the custom build route but not likely at a price you want to pay…

You can build one yourself possibly using Total Composites panels…
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
If there was a market for this then don’t you suppose some company would be making them?

You can go the custom build route but not likely at a price you want to pay…

You can build one yourself possibly using Total Composites panels…
The Hallmark flatbed campers are pretty close to this. in the $200k all-in price range (on a nicely kitted F-350)
 
I realize a fully optioned F550 could cost $80k these days. Is someone saying a chassis mounted version of a “traditional” type truck camper costs $120k now?
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
I realize a fully optioned F550 could cost $80k these days. Is someone saying a chassis mounted version of a “traditional” type truck camper costs $120k now?
If you fully option a Hallmark flatbed it can be well over $150k, not including the cost of the flatbed which is $15-25k additional.

But it's also unlikely that someone would leave the chassis in stock condition. Winch bumpers, lights, lockers, sliders, in cab electronics, etc.

It's very possible to spend $250-300k if you really go all out.
 

CORE_vehicles

New member
I left them a question on Instagram or Facebook about whether they would be using the larger 6.6L gas engine also, but didn't get a response. It has a fair bit more HP and torque than the current 6.0. I suppose that they want to make sure that all their current Fuso stock is sold before advertising the Isuzu chassis.
Steve, we are using the 6.6 l Motor in the new Isuzu NPR. Sorry I missed your message.
 

zb39

Adventurer
I realize a fully optioned F550 could cost $80k these days. Is someone saying a chassis mounted version of a “traditional” type truck camper costs $120k now?
I ordered my Ram 5500 and put full 4 link kelderman air suspension on it front and rear, CMSK bed. Then attached a 2022 Host Cascade to it. Great rig. Can sleep 4 easy but we only really need 2. Around $160K total, but prices less than a year later are even higher, assuming you can even find them
 

Delsh

Active member
I feel I must have missed something in this thread; isn't the EC TerraNova fitting in the niche many are describing here? Price falls between the $199K and $500K mentioned, and features/capabilities seem to match what folks desire. Not even @Core-vehicles mentioned the TerraNova in this thread - I'm a bit surprised one EC did not 'cross-sell' another. That the platform is a F350/3500 too small? Would expect not, as the EC engineers are pretty solid...

Rossmonster Baja? No, since it's on a 3/4 ton chassis?
 

Steve_382

Active member
It makes total sense to me. Van Pelts can concentrate on the big rigs and true overland global trucks. Story teller gets a expanded product line to address the US 4x4 RV crowd like me that refuses to own a Mercedes Sprinter chassis for off roading.
GXV expertise in developing the AT transferred to storytellers production could be a huge win win. I'd probably wait and let the new company build 4-5 first for someone else, but I’d buy one for sure. Its our target truck.
I am also quite interested in the smaller Adventure Truck. I sent a couple emails to StoryTeller though asking if they had any idea when they might start producing them at their new plant and only heard crickets. Nothing.
 

blulegend

New member
Hard to tell from the video on AEONrv website if the vehicle has a kinetic subframe mounting system to allow the chassis to twist and flex without torquing the box. If it plans to do any serious off-roading, it‘s going to need it.
I was wondering the same thing. Especially with the pass through.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
Hard to tell from the video on AEONrv website if the vehicle has a kinetic subframe mounting system to allow the chassis to twist and flex without torquing the box. If it plans to do any serious off-roading, it‘s going to need it.
there are only two chassis I know off that do not need a torsion free subframe. 1. Mercedes sprinter cab chassis and 2. Ford transit cab chassis.
I drive a transit and can confirm that there is zero issues without a subframe. But what you do need are wheel wells to allow for your suspension to move. Not needing a subframe also means less weight, cost savings and reduced overall height.
 
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