OPINION: Single or dual ARB compressor

#1
Hey everyone,

So after my Big Bend trip and not having an air compressor, I am looking into either a single or dual piston ARB compressor.

My question is is the dual version worth the extra money over the single version. I have an electronic locker in the front now and may add an air locker in the rear later down the road but I may go with another electronic locker if that works out.

So for my situation for just airing up tires after a trail run, will the single ARB compressor work just as fine as the dual?

What are y'alls thoughts?

Thanks!
 
#2
Air locker is irrelevant, does not use much air. Single works fine, is slower but cheaper, takes less space. Twin is better, bigger, faster, more expensive. If time is money, get the twin. If you air down often or are running 37s, the twin is worth the extra burden. If you are in a smaller vehicle, the single will work for you.
 
#3
They don't recommend the single ARB compressor for inflating tires, and it is still way more expensive than other compressors that could handle that task. The only real good use for the single is for lockers. I would recommend the one I have but don't want to turn the thread into something the poster isn't asking. On the other side of his question yes pony-up for the dual compressor it is one of the best on the market for it's size, that can be hard mounted. I bought a used set of axles loaded with ARB's and also came with the little compressor. So I to was wondering the same thing. Even their site states that it doesn't have enough volume.
 
#5
Yeah the single still to small for the 35" unless your going to take a dinner break while your airing up your tires.


Brand: ARB

Air Flow: 19.7LPM @ 200kPa

Duty Cycle: 35% at 72 Deg. Fahrenheit
 
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#6
They don't recommend the single ARB compressor for inflating tires...
Oh, but they do. ARB offers more than one single. The portable single can be used as a portable or can be hardmounted (as can the portable twin). Comes with its own pressure switch, so you can use it right out of the box. It will work on 35s, but it's going to take awhile.
 
#7
Yeah the single still to small for the 35" unless your going to take a dinner break while your airing up your tires.


Brand: ARB

Air Flow: 19.7LPM @ 200kPa

Duty Cycle: 35% at 72 Deg. Fahrenheit
That's the compressor designed solely for air lockers. The single piston compressor CKMA12 pushes 66lpm at 50% duty cycle and is suitable for tire inflation. I've done my 33s plenty of times and other people's 35s a few times. It will obviously be slower than the twin since it has half the air flow but the smaller size and lower price made it a better choice for me.
 

M1078

Adventurer
#8
This is a timely thread for me as I'm in exactly the same position. I want the portable and thought the twin would be better since it has the pony tank and can run air tools. Then I started thinking about how often I'd actually run air tools and decided the single would get the job done and leave me money left over for other things.
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
#9
I go though this decision for every new vehicle;
ARB (last I checked-last summer) had 3 compressors the smallest is not recommended for tire inflation.
The medium (larger single cylinder) will inflate tires but some patience is required.
The 2 cylinder is primarily for tire inflation and is more than enough to also run air lockers.

Since I am patient and have all the time in the world I normally get the larger single cylinder compressor... adding ARBs & regearing is a standard mod for me
As I also like to mod the vehicle; I often convert non operational vehicle air conditioning compressors to function as air compressors; they normally put even dual cylinder electric vehicle compressors to shame, in terms of CFM (and cost).
There are many DIY/HowTo threads on the web on this conversion
Since the TJ came with low pressure lockers I don't need to install an ARB (as long as they last) so I bought a Cheap chinese portable compressor to handle tire airing up at least until the A/C dies. After stripping this M/F 1050 down to make it fit in an ammo can; I cannot recommend it as it has too many hard to fix design issues.. it will likely last a while airing up smaller tires though.

Enjoy!
 
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#12
I went with the single/portable.

I saw the single vs double as trading speed for current draw. I decided I did not need the speed, and since I was getting the portable, I wanted lower current draw as it might be in several different vehicles. I chose correctly, I as I have used in in my Hummer, 2500HD, CJ-7 and passenger car. I also converted it to the Warn quickconnect system, so no opening hood and full compatibility with that jump charge system. When I need more speed, I have an auxilary tank I can pre-fill.
 

Oogs

New member
#13
I've had both. Go with the dual, why mess around. It is worth the extra $$. The first dual I used for 3 years before selling that rig, never let me down. I'm 5 years into my second dual compressor. Both setups had 5 gallon tanks and chucks fore and aft. I'm adding one to my other 4x4.
 
#14
I've ran the viair(FAILED after 6 uses). I bought the ARB dual compressor, works great. I'm running 35" MTR's, I'm plumbing in an expired air tank(4200 psi) for more volume. I recommend the dual compressor, Ron
 
#15
No experience with singles but the dual is the bomb! Does 35's like a walk in the park with no auxiliary tank. IMHO worth the extra $ if you run larger tires.