Post up your drawer/storage system

Corey

OverCamping Specialist
@Corey How do the drawers mount to the plate exactly? Do you drill into the plate and mount drawers where ever you want or is the plate pre-drilled and you place the drawers to fit the plate holes?
The plate has predrilled holes with nut inserts in it.
And when you place the cargobox on top of the plate, you have sliders on a rail system you can move around to the hole you want to position the box where you want it.
You then insert the bolts from the moving slider into the plate, and tighten both the sliding rail and the bolt in the plate.
Pretty slick setup.
 

wADVr

Adventurer
After years of going around and around on what would work or not I finally built a platform for the back of my JKU.

It is partially to support two dogs while there are 2 kids in the back seat, partially to be a sleeping platform for one, maybe two eventually and also a way to separate, contain and organize items. I also had to build this with quick removal in mind as I use my Jeep for many different uses.

The platform is 3/4” birch plywood with 30” locking sliders recessed into each verticle piece to reduce wasted space and allow for enough room on the drivers side for a Dometic dual zone 65 fridge eventually. An ARB fridge will fit just fine as will my current large Igloo cooler. The drivers side of the platform is easily removable and able to reinstall. When no cooler or fridge is occupying the space it is just about the right area for an additional storage box.
Most build an actual drawer that requires loading on the Jeep, I wanted to use removable storage boxes mounted on a metal tray so the boxes can be removed, packed in the house or even swapped out for more appropriate items easily. There are two Front Runner Wolf Pack boxes on the tray currently. One has recovery gear and tools, the other is misc day trip supplies. The idea is to have a different box packed with family supplies that I can just swap out depending on the trip. Previously I had a couple larger boxes that I was constantly rummaging through each trip to pack a single one depending on the trip. While not horrible I wanted something easy to grab and go as I can be somewhat spontaneous. Also designing a platform that allowed the storage to be under allowed our dogs to take up the space above without getting into food etc.

Anyhow this is what I created with the help of my father in law and a few additional items I will add are a platform on the passenger side to allow for a single occupant sleeping area and also bracket for Rotopax water storage on the drivers side to fill the gap between the cooler/fridge and wheel well (as the fridge needs to clear the gate latch and cannot sit close to the side and be slid out. I have yet to decide whether I will be carpeting the top or using a bed liner type coating my reservation to the bed liner coating is the dogs are hard on this type surface with their nails A8F7F572-E4C7-4ED5-8EAD-F75C7DECFB07.jpegDD50CB67-EBDF-4C9A-964A-29352502A7F5.jpeg2C1EEFB8-88F5-41D7-B7B2-7F600A977A11.jpegF4B4A09D-18ED-468C-BA15-3AA3E1D7AD5B.jpeg2D53DF13-94D4-4306-8F15-F2B08C4910ED.jpeg7E22AB3C-4877-4D60-99D8-F72A82FA3B27.jpeg
 

tacozord

Adventurer
Last November, I built my bed storage. The storage is basically made up of a frame and walls. I used 3/4" Baltic birch plywood for the frame and walls and 1/2" Baltic birch plywood for the lids. In this image, you can see the basic frame setup. This is front driver side.




The manner in which I secured the frame in place wasn't necessarily uniform throughout the bed. But generally, I attached small blocks of wood to the bed walls and then attached the frame to these. This image shows the detail of how the frame is attached to the bed sides and how I had to fur out some of the blocks to accommodate the rails and shell. This image is just above the driver-side wheel well.




Here's the framing around my aux battery and RTMR. This is front passenger side. Take note that there is a wall to the left of the battery, which is removable, and basically keeps the electrical area isolated.




With regards to design, the entire storage area is simply a frame. The only walls are what surround the clear area down the middle of the bed, which you'll see in just a moment. This was done to maximize storage as well as keep the weight down to a minimum. To secure the walls to the bed floor, I used rivet nuts and then attached small blocks of plywood with 1/4-20 bolts. The walls were then screwed to these blocks of wood.




At the rear of the vehicle, I simply attached the plywood to the bed sides using wood screws directly into the fiberglass bed. Worked out great. Notice that I still have access to the OEM storage compartment.




With the fridge slide-out cabinet already installed, I was able to attach my storage framing directly to it.




The storage is complete, but not yet painted or covered in carpet. I haven't decided exactly how I want to do this. All of the plywood on top of the frame is removable to allow access to the storage underneath. These are currently held in place with gravity, but I installed small blocks of wood to the underside to keep them from sliding around. Also, this image shows the walls surrounding the clear area down the middle of the bed.



Here's another angle taken from the tent/sleeping area above the cab. Notice that I left a corridor or "hallway" down the middle. This is used for two Action Packer storage boxes while traveling. These are removed when at camp so I retain standing height in the bed. It's also a great bench to sit on.




From the rear of the vehicle, you can see how everything is packed and has its place. In my truck build thread, I showed building my fridge slide-out and mentioned how tight the tolerances were. As this image shows, there is no extra room. I had to build the fridge slide-out with the exact measurements of the gas cans, Action Packers, plywood wall thickness, and the width of the drawer slides. That was quite the challenge.




In conclusion, this build has definitely met my needs and I couldn't be happier. I went into it without a clear vision of how to make it work. I just knew what I needed and worked around that. The key was to have enough foresight to think of any potential pitfalls. The prime example is the tight tolerances that I had to keep in mind when I built the fridge slight-out.

Let me know what you think and if you have any ideas of how I could have improved this. Maybe it'll help the next person who wants to do something similar.
 

tacozord

Adventurer
How much clearance did you leave for air circulation at the vent area of the fridge?
I'm not sure how much clearance I have exactly. There's probably an inch or so from the back of the fridge to the back and side walls of the fridge cabinet. In addition, I'm not sure if you noticed in the pics, but I cut out vent holes on the back and sides of the fridge cabinet to help. Of course the Action Packers will block this a bit and the items in storage behind the fridge might block some of the air flow as well. But at the time of the build, my hope was that this would be sufficient.

In practice, I haven't run into any issues after eight months of use. But I keep my eye on it and can make some adjustments if necessary.
 

Airmapper

High-Tech Redneck
It took me a while to think on what would work best for my Xterra. The cargo area kinda sucks, it's hard plastic, and even though you do have a nice set of utility tracks (C channel) if you don't lash everything down like it's on the back of a mule it rolls around with every turn. Xterra's also have this storage recess under the floor, which is great, if there is absolutely nothing in the cargo area and you can pick up the floor to get to it. In my case that was never, so I literally had a huge empty space under there, as I knew anything in it woulden't be worth the effort to retrieve.

The stock Xterra cargo area:



I like drawers but they take up a lot of space in materials, and I don't have that much space to waste. A drawer would also remove any possibility of under floor access. Eventually I thought of a sliding platform which would be all the benefits of a drawer, and allow access to the under floor space on demand by literally moving everything on top off. The platform could also accommodate cargo management by more fastening options, and a carpeted surface would minimize items slipping around and making noise.

I designed it around a set of lock-in / lock-out Orr & Orr slides boasting a 500lb weight rating, surely overkill for my uses.

I also added tracks on all 4 sides from US Cargo control which have different types of tie down points that clip in and can move anywhere on the track. These bolt through the plywood floor into the slide frame, tying everything together structurally.

An early test fit:


A later test fit with slides extended:


The platform itself in progress:



The completed slide:




To compliment the slide and gain even more storage options, I also added a shelf over top of it. This is a more common Xterra cargo area mod, but I adapted my version to attach sharing the same mounting points as the slide. While integrated with the shelf mounting, it can be used alone just as easily. This also presented a lighting issue, seeing as it blocked overhead lighting I had previously installed, so I added LED lighting directly to the underside of the shelf, and made a plug in to interface with my interior lighting, and mimics it in all ways, including turning on and off with the door.

Additionally I added a few 1" strips on the sides, spaced 1" apart, which is basically MOLLE. So MOLLE pouches can be attached to the sides as pockets on the left and right. I also hang items from the rails, a mag dump pouch makes a perfect mini trash bag holder, and slides around the side when not in use.

Finished shelf:


And finally, it's first run in use.



 
It took me a while to think on what would work best for my Xterra. The cargo area kinda sucks, it's hard plastic, and even though you do have a nice set of utility tracks (C channel) if you don't lash everything down like it's on the back of a mule it rolls around with every turn. Xterra's also have this storage recess under the floor, which is great, if there is absolutely nothing in the cargo area and you can pick up the floor to get to it. In my case that was never, so I literally had a huge empty space under there, as I knew anything in it woulden't be worth the effort to retrieve.

The stock Xterra cargo area:



I like drawers but they take up a lot of space in materials, and I don't have that much space to waste. A drawer would also remove any possibility of under floor access. Eventually I thought of a sliding platform which would be all the benefits of a drawer, and allow access to the under floor space on demand by literally moving everything on top off. The platform could also accommodate cargo management by more fastening options, and a carpeted surface would minimize items slipping around and making noise.

I designed it around a set of lock-in / lock-out Orr & Orr slides boasting a 500lb weight rating, surely overkill for my uses.

I also added tracks on all 4 sides from US Cargo control which have different types of tie down points that clip in and can move anywhere on the track. These bolt through the plywood floor into the slide frame, tying everything together structurally.

An early test fit:


A later test fit with slides extended:


The platform itself in progress:



The completed slide:




what did you use inside of the slides to make the (it guess it would be called) shape or framework? is that aluminum with brackets?
 

Airmapper

High-Tech Redneck
what did you use inside of the slides to make the (it guess it would be called) shape or framework? is that aluminum with brackets?
It's all steel angle. I debated using aluminum for weight savings but I don't think it would have made much difference (slides and plywood are the bulk of it) and not been as vibration resistant. Plus it would have complicated fabrication. I got as thin metal as I could get and welded it at the corners.
 

rally roo

New member
I recently picked up a VW Touareg TDI as a "goldilocks" vehicle (fast and fun to drive, great fuel mileage, great in snow and soft-road, huge towing capacity, etc.), and wanted to make it more practical for camping trips, but also still work as a DD.

For the trunk, I built a frame out of a steel pallet that my lawnmower came on, then mounted birch ply with carpet over top. I opted against slide-style drawers so I can swap out plastic tote bins with camping equipment quickly and easily. With the rear seats down, I can install a removable platform that mounts flush to the trunk frame (the rear seat backs are at an angle when folded, making it an awkward space to use). The full platform is ~68" long, so at 6'3" I have to sleep at a diagonal. Great for solo camping, but I'll definitely bring a tent as well.











 

blackohio

Observer
I built this to take advantage of existing bedslide. Has platform and the slide functions as the lower drawer. platform has single center support that rides on the bedslide itself on a rollerblade bearing. Rear of platform behind fridge is where the solar set-up is. Overall it meets my needs but I will be making changes that maybe doesnt utilize the bedslide itself.IMG_6334.JPGIMG_6335.JPGIMG_6336.JPGIMG_6337.JPGIMG_6338.JPGIMG_6339.JPGIMG_6340.JPGIMG_6341.JPG
 
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MCX

TalesFromTheDesert.com
I just finished up a rear cargo drawer system for my Xterra. Lots of great inspiration from so many awesome builds on this site and others. But, the main area I drew inspiration was from: https://theadventureindex.com/shop/

Here's the basics on my setup:
-- 1/2" birch
-- Cut the bottom of each drawer so I could still access the underneath rear cargo tray by folding the back seats forward
-- 400 lb full extension drawer slides
-- 333 lb D-rings bolted with 5/16" pronged tee-nuts and bolts on the top (so I can still strap things down, when needed)
-- Side "wings" are removable, so I can use the space under them, too
-- 12" interior hieght
-- Driver-side drawer is 2-feet deep
-- Passenger-side drawer has a "drawer within a drawer" and a spring loaded prep table. There's room under the prep table to store silverware, spices, spatula, tongs, etc. (or anything else that's no taller than 4")

Pictures...






 
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