Question: Cooking with cast iron

Pop-over pans are awesome and the old cast ones are the best by far.

I have an old Griswold similar to that I got on ebay. It was rusty but intact. After some electrolysis, and reseasoning, it's been great. My wife makes corn muffins, molten chocolate muffins and real actual pop-overs.

I wonder why 11 was the optimal number of muffins? Both Griswold and Wagner pop-over pans make 11.
 
Lodge is a popular and good quality company. But no matter what, the new stuff just isn't as good as the old stuff. I find that all the new pre-seasoned stuff is very rough and needs to be sanded and re-seasoned.

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If you were not lucky enough to inherit the family cast iron, check local Craigslist ads and ebay for older cast iron ware. Can get pricey, but an old Griswold or Revere skillet or dutch oven is worth it, even if you have to strip it back to clean metal, sand it, and build up the seasoning again.

I use stuff that originally belonged to my grandmother.
 
my recent post from "Who still uses cast iron while traveling?":

I learned to cook from my Italian grandfather, and much of my education was with iron. I've used everything else since, at one time or another. Iron never fails. It is just so easy to get perfect results. I still have my grandfathers cast iron skillet.

But you can always learn a new trick, hmmm? I did about 7 years ago, from an onetime (girl)friend (and great cook) now very accomplished at Japanese cooking techniques. One word; Nambu

Nambu-style ironware, from Morioka in Iwate Prefecture, Japan. A number of authentic producers, such as Ferramica Kawaguchi i-mono and Iwachu... and, if you have used Snow Peak ironware, you have used Nambu. But like Iwachu, this is the moderate quality stuff (by Japanese standards). Try Ferramica Kawaguchi i-mono.

Wow. Amazingly light. Astonishingly strong, thin-wall casting. Tough. Cooking surfaces as smooth as that popular patterned or pebbled nonstick advertised to improve cooking performance, except the Japanese have been making these for 400 years. Guess what? They work. Better. Much.

But for camping? Something so bloody expensive? Well, my Kawaguchi i-mono frying pan weighs one-quarter, that's 25%, of the same size Lodge. I really like Lodge; used them many times, all good. But all I had to do was pick up a Ferramica Kawaguchi i-mono, and I was in love. I use it every single trip, occasionally bringing along a Iwachu omelette pan, or Snow Peak micro-oval oven, if I want to do something special.

Pics below:

Kawaguchi.jpg

Iwachu.jpg

WP_20141115_08_35_36_Pro.jpg

WP_20141115_08_37_23_Pro.jpg

One last note; my mascot, courtesy of my wife. Yes, the mouse. His name is Ferrous... ;-) He keeps napkins on the table, and generally keeps an eye on me.
 
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So where do you get those pans?
I learned to cook from my Italian grandfather, and much of my education was with iron. I've used everything else since, at one time or another. Iron never fails. It is just so easy to get perfect results. I still have my grandfathers cast iron skillet.

But you can always learn a new trick, hmmm? I did about 7 years ago, from an onetime (girl)friend (and great cook) now very accomplished at Japanese cooking techniques. One word; Nambu

Nambu-style ironware, from Morioka in Iwate Prefecture, Japan. A number of authentic producers, such as Ferramica Kawaguchi i-mono and Iwachu... and, if you have used Snow Peak ironware, you have used Nambu. But like Iwachu, this is the moderate quality stuff (by Japanese standards). Try Ferramica Kawaguchi i-mono.

Wow. Amazingly light. Astonishingly strong, thin-wall casting. Tough. Cooking surfaces as smooth as that popular patterned or pebbled nonstick advertised to improve cooking performance, except the Japanese have been making these for 400 years. Guess what? They work. Better. Much.

But for camping? Something so bloody expensive? Well, my Kawaguchi i-mono frying pan weighs one-quarter, that's 25%, of the same size Lodge. I really like Lodge; used them many times, all good. But all I had to do was pick up a Ferramica Kawaguchi i-mono, and I was in love. I use it every single trip, occasionally bringing along a Iwachu omelette pan, or Snow Peak micro-oval oven, if I want to do something special.

Pics below:

View attachment 298767

View attachment 298768

View attachment 298769

View attachment 298770

One last note; my mascot, courtesy of my wife. Yes, the mouse. His name is Ferrous... ;-) He keeps napkins on the table, and generally keeps an eye on me.
 

emtmark

Austere Medical Provider
Clearly there is much to learn and explore here with this information! Thank you! I will be keeping my eyes peeled now for this light weight iron


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
If you live in SoCal, and want to see these pans in person (among other awesome cookware) visit:

HITACHIYA
2509W PACIFIC COAST HWY,
TORRANCE CA 90505
Tel:310.534.3136
info@hitachiya-usa.com
added website :) http://www.hitachiya.com

Livermore? Search around in JapanTown and Pacific Heights in the City (SF). I have visited a number of awesome cookware stores in that area, and someone will carry this brand, and others.
 
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