Ready to make larger committment, seeking ideas

jkam

nomadic man
You are correct.
Livability for me is something in the 24 to 27 foot range.
And just as important to me is a good view with big windows.
After living in my Lazy Daze for so long and having nice big tinted windows, I am spoiled.


As I mentioned, it's all a compromise in some way.
 

Bayou Boy

Adventurer
Something to remember when you decide to live in something full time is livability.
Most of the expedition type vehicles are designed to travel in more harsh conditions.
A question I asked myself when deciding to live full time on the road was, what is more important,
capability or comfort. It's always a compromise no matter which way you go.
I chose comfort, for me it was an easy choice.
Others will lean towards capability.

My advice is to look seriously at what your life will look life for the next 10 years and choose based upon that.
Something to remember when you decide to live in something full time is livability.
Most of the expedition type vehicles are designed to travel in more harsh conditions.
A question I asked myself when deciding to live full time on the road was, what is more important,
capability or comfort. It's always a compromise no matter which way you go.
I chose comfort, for me it was an easy choice.
Others will lean towards capability.

My advice is to look seriously at what your life will look life for the next 10 years and choose based upon that.
This is definitely something to think about. I’ve been through an ATC pop up camper, a Lance truck camper, a ruggedized, lifted, pull behind pop up, and right now i’m sitting in my new Outdoors RV 23DBS. Everything else I’ve owned would get considerably further in the woods where I’d really like to be but they were miserable hanging out inside with the family on super hot or rainy days or after a long day on the road. This thing is crazy nice to chill in and will get 85% of everywhere I’d want to go. There is a point where comfort trumps everything else. Think hard about that before going to far to the “off-road” side.
 

jkam

nomadic man
Another consideration that I have struggled with is the chassis to use.
Sure a Man, or for me a Bucher Duro chassis would be awesome.
Then I realize the expense of keeping something like that on the road.
As you go up in GVW, you also go up in expense, and there is a tipping point as to what is practical.
If I had the funds and were going RTW, I would probably choose something by Mercedes.
They seem to have the best world wide support, something you would almost surely need at some point.
But I am done roaming the world for now and am happy in a class C and boon docking on our public lands.
 

shade

Active member
Everything else I’ve owned would get considerably further in the woods where I’d really like to be but they were miserable hanging out inside
The more I think about it, that sentiment seems more important. I'll hike for days and be a grimy mess with a grin on my face. I wouldn't be grinning if I returned to my home-on-wheels and wasn't comfortable. It's not like there's some better place to stay; you're home.
 

rruff

Explorer
So far, it looks like both, with a bias towards living quarters.
Based on this quote in the OP, I'd say off-road capability is more of an afterthought.

"I have traveled quite a lot in my van in the United States, mostly on paved roads and nothing crazy but mainly because my van is 2wd. So I'm definitely not opposed to getting off the beaten path. I think I would do so if my rig was capable of it. "

And the comforts of home are primary.

"im single but I don't want a rig built for one person. I'd like to be able to have ample space for things (bring food, toys, for festivals and gatherings etc ) and for when people are over, especially dates etc. It's weird when I have a guest over, and I have to fold out a toilet if they need to use the bathroom and do the business in the same area where we are hanging out. It seems like a permanent, separate space for that seems better.
...As homey as possible honestly, not so much campervan living situation, which is where I'm at now."
 

rruff

Explorer
The more I think about it, that sentiment seems more important. I'll hike for days and be a grimy mess with a grin on my face. I wouldn't be grinning if I returned to my home-on-wheels and wasn't comfortable. It's not like there's some better place to stay; you're home.
Different strokes for sure. To me the hassle of carrying and maintaining the stuff in a typical RV (or a typical overlanding vehicle for that matter) isn't worth it. I like being outside, and I like having just what I need and no more. Did it for 13 years and never once wished for more "comfort", or more equipment.
 

shade

Active member
Different strokes for sure. To me the hassle of carrying and maintaining the stuff in a typical RV (or a typical overlanding vehicle for that matter) isn't worth it. I like being outside, and I like having just what I need and no more. Did it for 13 years and never once wished for more "comfort", or more equipment.
I prefer going with less, and what I do have, I want to be reliable and simple to maintain. I don't want any hassles, and if I see one creep into my travels, I take up the challenge of eliminating it. Having more gear usually runs counter to how I like to do things, kind of like the Fight Club line:


When considering a full home replacement on wheels, I think it's still possible to use those principles to guide choices, and comfort can be had. Simple things, such as choosing down bedding over using a heater, choosing a good campsite over using AC, and not taking Hollywood showers can make a big difference in the experience, but still allow for comfort.

  • Is there a place for everything?
  • Will it all stay put?
  • Is there room to move around?
  • If the weather's bad, can I easily prepare meals?
  • Is the bed comfortable?
  • Do I have a good view from inside? (Thanks for that one, Jay)
  • How easy is it to store and remove waste?
  • Do I have to run a generator often? Ever?
  • Do I have some shade?
  • Do I have a comfortable place to sit & eat or read?
  • Once on site, how long can I realistically be fully self-supporting?
Questions like those seem more important to answer than the breakover angle of the vehicle, IMO.
 

Michelle@EarthCruiser

Supporting Sponsor
Maybe the best thing to do would be to go look at all of these options and then decide what is right for you. Personally I like knowing that when the weather is ugly I can be inside and not living on top of my spouse. I like knowing that I can go anywhere for long periods of time and then leave when I want to. Life is short, make a decision about what works for you.
 

trailsurfer

Explorer
I think you should look at a new Tiger or a used Earthroamer. Enough size to be comfortable and host guests, and capable of getting you to campsites that most others can't get too.
 

TylerA23

New member
Nothing to add, other than a simple thanks to everyone who has contributed thus far. This has been one of the most enjoyable, and informing, reads I’ve come across on this site.
Thanks!, keep it up, and good luck to the OP
 

foxhunter

Adventurer
rblackwell, a member of this site has traveled much of the world in a Tiger, an Earthroamer, and a GXV on a U500 chassis. He has a website , whiteacorn.com. Before I bought my vehicle in 2011-2012, I spent a lot of time researching his thoughts on all three vehicles. He has a ton of practical experience in those vehicles. you should look into his site and some of his old posts here. He had an earthroamer and the GXV at the same time, both of which he has since sold and I believe he and Nina are now traveling around Australia.
 

SDDiver5

Expedition Leader
Check it. Looks to be an incredible deal.
 

thinairathlete

New member
My wife and I have traveled extensively and lived full time in an Earthcruiser. North and south of the border, through the canyons in Utah and mountain roads in Colorado. It works well for two people and is luxurious for one. The truck is narrow and low enough to get down most trails and narrow streets in Latin America. The 650 watts of solar easily keep the batteries topped off for extended periods away even on cloudy days. If you are interested it is now for sale here on Expedition Portal. We are moving out of the country and cant take it with us. Will consider any offer.522914
 

The_3_bears

New member
Ya know, the big guys out there make great XVs. You will not find anyone who argues with the quality and work they put into them...that being said, you can design and build your own for a lot less...also, not related, no affiliation, but there is a duramax 5500 on the classified board asking 92k. Cash talks and you’ll then have more than 200k to go bonkers and remodel the rig...seriously it doesn’t look like it needs much
 
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