Realistic weight or length limits?

driveby

New member
We are planning out a build. Looks like a 6x6 class chassis is likely. But since I'm still researching and questioning things I have a couple basic Q.

EU has a 7.5T weight limit or you are into commercial/restricted territory? Easy to get around or a really bad idea to overshoot 7.5T?
Along those lines is there a max weight folks have seen that really prohibits access to areas?
Is there a wheelbase/length that really starts to limit you?

From what I can gather a LOA of 35' is doable but I'd like to fact check that for BLM areas or forestry roads. I know a lot of coastal BC forestry roads near mountains that a Jeep TJ is too big :D What has your experience been?

Have you noticed a lot of weight limits on roads/bridges where something over say 20K or 30K pounds becomes a no go?

We are coming out of a Class A with lots of space and storage. And since the plan is to venture further away from civilization for longer, storage/fridge/freezer space seems to be a priority.
 

Howard70

Adventurer
Hello Driveby:

Basically smaller vehicles will always get more places than larger vehicles. We travel in an EarthCruiser measuring 22 x 8.5 x 6.5'. We're pleased with the camping spots we can reach. but personally feel anything larger would limit our access to many remote corners of public lands. For us an overall length of 35' would be impossible. There are a lot of access roads in National Parks, National Forests, and BLM areas that specific require or recommend vehicles less than 24'.

We also see a fair number of Forest Service and BLM bridges limited to 10,000 lbs but a 6 ton limit is more common in our experience. Another restriction we see occasionally on maintained backcountry routes deals with the number of axles. I think the reasoning is for tight twisty sections where more than two axles could characterize a vehicle that would have a hard time on the turns.

Howard
 
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billiebob

Well-known member
I know a lot of coastal BC forestry roads near mountains that a Jeep TJ is too big :D What has your experience been?
lol are you crazy.... FSRs are built for..........
But that said, 35' long is crazy. Loggers build roads specifically to haul logs and once done they often get decommissioned. Plus loggers build roads in and out with turn arounds at the ends, want to turn back before the end ya will need to back up to the start with 35'.

395cf16bbf609ded5275a33a7356941d.jpg

I drive a TJR with a trailer and have never turned back.

35' might have some issues here tho.

In my mind you are going to be giving up wayyy too much going so big and heavy.
 
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gdaut

Active member
Everything is a compromise and every rig is too small when you are parked and inside it (especially in bad weather) and too large when you are driving it (especially in a grocery store parking lot). But, do not underestimate the time you will spend in grocery store parking lots and similar environs. At least for me, trips are a lot of dirt roads and BLM/USFS dispersed camping, but also a lot of going through towns. And I like to stop in the towns, buy groceries, visit the coffee shop/bar/etc. My camper is about 25 feet long, and I often have a bike rack on the back. It is manageable in town, but I would not want it to be larger. If I switch rigs at some point, it will be to something smaller.
 

BillFitz

New member
Everything is a compromise indeed. Where to you want to go? If you want to get off the beaten path, down narrow and height challenged trails, a footprint larger than 10’ tall and 24’ long and 14,000# will be a serious limitation, so that quashes thoughts about a 6x6. Custer State Park has beautiful tunnels that are about 10’6” tall, and there are plenty of old narrow gauge railroad tunnels and USFS wooden bridges in the west with weight and height limitations. I would never trade access to those places for a larger vehicle, but that’s my choice. Your choice is equally as valid.

If you’re in a Class A right now, it will take a major life adjustment to shrink down to something under 24’, so maybe that 35’ 6x6 is what the doctor ordered. But your off road access will be really limited. A 35’ 6x6 is essentially a Class A motorhome on steroids. The only difference is that the 6x6 is off road capable which means that you’ll have to be prepared to self-rescue if you get stuck somewhere. A loaded 6x6 will weight over 25,000#, the tires weigh 350# each, and there ain’t no AAA that will come to the rescue when you’re on the dirt.

It’s Just stuff to think about.
 

Joe917

Explorer
At over 9 tons and 27' long our MB917AF went pretty much anywhere we wanted. The 917 has a very tight turning circle (tighter than a pick up truck) to turning around was rarely a problem. I would not want to go any bigger though.
 

RoamIt

Active member
I started out thinking I would be in the 6x6 35' camp. But definitely want to explore cities as well as remote areas. I'm shooting for a 24' build and my solution (for what's it's worth) for the places that that size rig is too big for is a "motorcycle sized" vehicle. Indeed, there are going (or are now) to be restrictions in the EU around any size internal combustion vehicle in some cities. I'm looking at some amazing electric vehicles that can seat 2 and allow some exploring both remote areas that a large rig may have trouble navigating, as well as working in cities with restrictions and/or narrow streets. The next few years are going have many types of these vehicles on the market.
 

Zuber

Active member
I started out thinking I would be in the 6x6 35' camp. But definitely want to explore cities as well as remote areas. I'm shooting for a 24' build and my solution (for what's it's worth) for the places that that size rig is too big for is a "motorcycle sized" vehicle. Indeed, there are going (or are now) to be restrictions in the EU around any size internal combustion vehicle in some cities. I'm looking at some amazing electric vehicles that can seat 2 and allow some exploring both remote areas that a large rig may have trouble navigating, as well as working in cities with restrictions and/or narrow streets. The next few years are going have many types of these vehicles on the market.
I can just imagine, sitting in a campground running a generator for 4 hours, recharging your 'clean' vehicle so you can explore trails.

But on the other hand, it would be great to rent one at the edge of town to explore a city.
 

RoamIt

Active member
I can just imagine, sitting in a campground running a generator for 4 hours, recharging your 'clean' vehicle so you can explore trails.

But on the other hand, it would be great to rent one at the edge of town to explore a city.
Classic example of commenting without knowing :rolleyes:

Solar panels, charging while driving, one battery installed, one always on charger ready to switch out, vastly improved range is already happening. And who says I'm trying to be 'clean' when I'm driving a 10 ton diesel beast? And I'm building the damn thing to avoid 'campgrounds'.

But thanks for imagining...
 

Alloy

Well-known member
At over 9 tons and 27' long our MB917AF went pretty much anywhere we wanted. The 917 has a very tight turning circle (tighter than a pick up truck) to turning around was rarely a problem. I would not want to go any bigger though.
What is the wheel base of your truck?
 

mog

Kodiak Wrangler
post a side view picture.... I really want to see how balanced it is, my mind says 6' front overhang, 12' wheelbase, 9' rear overhang
not being critical, just wanting to see it
One click on his post to all the photos you could want
one click.jpg

side.jpg
 

Joe917

Explorer
Tire diameter just over 3'-6". 20" folding rack high on rear for lightweight stuff.
After Canada there have been many repeat visits.
The First owner had the motor home professionally built on a brand new MB917AF chassis and lived in it full time for 18 years. We completely overhauled the truck then spent 6 of the next 8 years in it. We have just sold it on.
The short wheelbase combined with high overhangs is great off road. Although relatively slow she is also very stable on the highway.
Getting back to the thread, this is as big as I would go. I would not consider a 6X6. Weight becomes an issue in places like the Amazon where you are crossing a 50 year old wooden bridge and the water is too deep to drive around!
 

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