Recovery Equipment Recommendations

#16
Thanks everybody, for your contributions.

I've got a lot of gear to consider.

I favor strength overkill...
I couldn't agree more, I'm a structural designer by trade. I want everything I upgrade to try to match the alleged longevity of the Cummins 12V. Can anyone specifically recommend a product that they have used for a long time?
 

robert

Expedition Leader
#17
Start here (it's free and quick): https://www.warn.com/truck/winches/pdf/62885A7_rs.pdf

GET SOME QUALITY INSTRUCTION! Recovery isn't rocket science but it can and has killed and maimed people. There are plenty of fools on youtube doing all manner of unsafe things. You'll notice some of the people on here have various certifications listed under the profiles, look for some of these courses or at least try to meet up with some reputable people or clubs and go on some runs with them. Not only will you get to meet people to wheel with but you can get instruction from someone who has an idea what they are doing. You'll also get to handle different manufacturers products and decide which you like. Some of the gear is inexpensive, some isn't so no reason not to be informed before you break out the credit card.

And yeah, preventative maintenance on a safe and reliable vehicle are top priorities.

Two more free manuals for you:
http://8tharmy.korea.army.mil/safety/Toolbox/resources/Publications/fm21_305.pdf- Chapter 22
https://www.steelsoldiers.com/upload/misc/FM20-22.pdf
 
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#18
GET SOME QUALITY INSTRUCTION! Recovery isn't rocket science but it can and has killed and maimed people. There are plenty of fools on youtube doing all manner of unsafe things.
I think that's a key consideration. Not just the personal safety but knowing how to easily extract a vehicle vs destroy a vehicle.
Much like offroading, a person who knows what they're doing can coax a vehicle most people consider underpowered through an obstacle where a guy with an overbuilt machine will destroy themselves trying to "brute force" the same obstacle.

A fantastically powerful winch, mounted to solid frame extraction points will tear your body clean off your axles if you don't take the time to do a little digging around bogged wheels with a $15 shovel.
I love watching those recovery "fail" videos because in most cases the people had all the gear needed to get out. It was just improper application of good gear that turned a situation that would have been solved with low initial tire pressure into catastrophic damage to the vehicle.
 
#19
Kerensky97: Quote: "A fantastically powerful winch, mounted to solid frame extraction points will tear your body clean off your axles if you don't take the time to do a little digging around bogged wheels with a $15 shovel."


I think I understand the point, a shovel is a huge benefit in many situations, and often folks head for the big guns first. In a proper winch mount and recovery, the body is always removed from the winch forces. That is on body/frame construction of course. It will always be a frame to frame pull, as in two vehicles, or frame to extraction point: tree or equal.

There may be times when the body or axles are at risk, but that must be part of the consideration of the pull.

The entertainers on youtube hook on for convenience, or perhaps entertainment value, but it should never be to the body or the axle. Yes, they're bolted on, but those bolts are not designed for these forces.

Dale
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
#20
Snatch straps are useful, but poor technique can rack up extra damage in a hurry.

I just got a no/low stretch' 3"x30'x30,000lbs Smittybuilt strap the other day for ~$30. I thought the build quality was real nice and it had protective sleevign in all the right places which my previous used-forever strap did not.

 
#22
First and foremost...have a plan. Especially if you go wheeling/exploring by yourself. If you come to a section of trail or terrian that looks difficult...stop and survey the situation. You want to think about "how" you are going to get yourself out...before you get stuck or flop your rig over on its side. Look for solid anchor points (trees, structures, rocks, etc) for connecting recovery gear too. All of the best recovery gear in the world won't get you out of every situation, if they are rendered useless.

Already a lot of good info here...but I will add...have two or three good quaility flash/flood lights, several pairs of gloves, good first aid kit and go wheeling with a group or club prior to going at it alone.

Brian.
 
#23
First and foremost...have a plan. Especially if you go wheeling/exploring by yourself. If you come to a section of trail or terrian that looks difficult...stop and survey the situation. You want to think about "how" you are going to get yourself out...before you get stuck or flop your rig over on its side. Look for solid anchor points (trees, structures, rocks, etc) for connecting recovery gear too. All of the best recovery gear in the world won't get you out of every situation, if they are rendered useless.

Already a lot of good info here...but I will add...have two or three good quaility flash/flood lights, several pairs of gloves, good first aid kit and go wheeling with a group or club prior to going at it alone.

Brian.
As an avid motorcyclist, I'm always looking for an escape route. That's a great idea to "look before you leap".

Why several pairs of gloves?
 
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#24
Jury-rigging Kit

Besides a tire repair kit, what other jury-rigging items are a good idea to bring? Duct tape seems obvious.

1. Duct tape
2. Tire plug kit
3. Spare filters
4. Spare fuses
5. Quick curing epoxy?

Does anything else come to mind?
 

jgaz

Adventurer
#25
Besides a tire repair kit, what other jury-rigging items are a good idea to bring? Duct tape seems obvious.

1. Duct tape
2. Tire plug kit
3. Spare filters
4. Spare fuses
5. Quick curing epoxy?

Does anything else come to mind?
Just off the top of my head

Cable ties
Large ratchet tie down strap
Safety Wire
Mechanics wire: aka bailing wire
Perforated metal strap : aka plumbers tape
Misc. nuts and bolts. (I keep mine in an old Nalgene water bottle stuffed with a rag)
Couple feet of chain. 3/8”? link wire diameter
Small coil of electrical wire and assortment of crimp on terminals.
 
#27
Mainly for several recoveries, especially during the late fall or winter. Cold mud and water makes for cold wet gloves...and anymore...putting on a dry pair to start the next recovery seems appropriate.

Brian.
Good to know. Eventually, I would like an integrated system to dry gear (like hot air in the bathroom). I've also got a boot/glove drier that I wonder if I've got space for.
 
#28
Quick curing epoxy?
JB Weld

This has helped out on past adventures.
One time comes to mind... a buddy's fuel cell was leaking...JD Weld to the rescue!

Bailing wire has been useful in the past as well.
Exploring Nicaragua in the early '90's and we broke a rear leaf spring. Bailing wire kept it in place until we were able to fabricate a new one.

Cheers
 
#29
I am in process of equipping my Jeep GC for longer and farther Overland trips. Before I start sinking a lot of money into recovery gear etc I scheduled a 2 day 4x4 off-road class to better understand my vehicle, my skills or (lack thereof) and proper recovery methods. The second day will be spend on more challenging terrain and we WILL get stuck so we will do plenty of recoveries. Goal is to use and understand various methods, the whens, whys and hows of self and assisted recoveries.

As I never recovered a stuck vehicle before I think the money spent to get proper training will be best money spent on rig.

Currently on my WK2 Jeep GC Overland I am running rock rails, full skid protection underneath and 275/55/20 Notto Grappler G2 tires along with 1100 Treds and Hi-Lift with tire lifting strap.
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
#30
Snatch straps are useful, but poor technique can rack up extra damage in a hurry.

I just got a no/low stretch' 3"x30'x30,000lbs Smittybuilt strap the other day for ~$30. I thought the build quality was real nice and it had protective sleevign in all the right places which my previous used-forever strap did not.

In the real world; I have personally seen much more destruction/vehicle damage when people attempt to use non stretchable tow straps/ropes, lifting straps, and/or chains for stuck vehicle recovery....
the typical scenario goes some thing like this;
A vehicle gets stuck.
Second vehicle (typically with) with over inflated half bald AT tires hooks up then spins tires without result.
Second vehicle backs up until the bumpers almost touch then takes off at full throttle either pulling some thing loose/off or damaging one or both bumpers...(or breaking the worn out tow rope/strap/chain)

In the same scenario the stretchable strap/kenetic rope has some give helping to prevent shock loading to both vehicles.

Vehicle recovery is best done with a slow careful methodology gradually increasing the force applied, or switching to lifting the vehicle/using mats etc. until the, typically mired, vehicle becomes unstuck.

Enjoy!
 
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