Reliability

jeepmedic46

Expedition Leader
Going to be looking for a new to me expedition vehicle. Was thinking about a Toyota. Going to be having extensive back surgery and looking for a vehicle that will be good for my back. Would be a older Rover. Is it true their not very reliable?
 

krick3tt

Adventurer
If you want something for comfort for your back I suggest you do not get anything old. They are not built for comfort, but are very utilitarian. Get something newer with more plush interior that translates to upgraded comfort.
I have had many older vehicles although not an older LR. I have a 07 LR3. I was cautioned about getting an older LR when I was in the market a few years ago and did not go the older route, this from a LR tech that fixes them.
I cannot speak to reliability but many older vehicles have been on the road/trail many years and are prone to lack of service that tends to be a recipe for unreliability.
It is your money and your back and this is just my 2 cents.
 

Correus

Adventurer
When it comes to old Rovers, which I love, a quote from Kandi (Two and a Half Men) comes to mind:

"...it's like being in the back seat of a car driven by a really smart kangaroo. He may go up on the curb a couple times, but he'll get you there."

So...not the best on backs.
 

jeepmedic46

Expedition Leader
It figures, I really like the old rovers but it doesn’t sound like one would be a good choice. I have to have surgery on my neck and per the surgeon half of my lower back needs to be fused. I guess i’ll Have to find another vehicle. Thank you everyone.
 

Ray_G

Explorer
My impression is that Rovers (old or new) are more comfortable than Toyotas. (We own, and have owned, both).

Reliability is a function of maintenance, knowledge, and ability to fix them. Rovers require attention, moreso than Toyotas. That said, as noted elsewhere, while they are rarely totally fixed they also almost always get you home unless they've been neglected or you are completely unlucky.

A good condition Range Rover Classic (RRC) will be fairly comfortable, particularly compared to other off road oriented vehicles of its age.

Were I looking to have a mixture of comfort and better than average Rover reliabilty for exploring offroad, I'd go LR3 (or perhaps Range Rover Sport (RRS) of the same vintage). It is worth noting these trucks are far cry from their predecessors in terms of reliability-while also upping their game in terms of comfort.

I would avoid Discovery 1's (though you can put RRC seats in them) since its a crap shoot to find one that has been maintained these days. I'd also avoid Discovery II's and their cousin, the P38 Range Rover, because those and reliability cannot be used in concert.

If you go newer, like LR4, you get a younger truck but at a higher cost than the LR3.

I'd suggest a test drive if you can find one locally, that will be the test for your back.
r-
Ray
 

MOguy

Explorer
Going to be looking for a new to me expedition vehicle. Was thinking about a Toyota. Going to be having extensive back surgery and looking for a vehicle that will be good for my back. Would be a older Rover. Is it true their not very reliable?

I worked with a guy that had some serious back issues. He had a Wrangler he didn't want to give up. He found a suspension seat and a doorstep that drops down when he opens the door. It works very well for him.

I have back issues but not very severe. For me the biggest deal is how low the seat is to the floorboard. If my knees have to be bent too much it bothers my back.

I can be comfortable all day long my Jeep Wrangler but I had a Chevy Cobalt its seats were low to the floor board and it would hurt my back after about 20.

For me it's not about how soft or hard to seat is, it's about the angle of my knees when I sit. What works for one person may not work for another.

As far as reliability, I had a 2004 4Runner with a 4.0 that had head issues at a hundred seventy thousand miles. it was common in the 2004 4Runners when they switch to 4.0 to have these issues. It's kind of hard to make a blanket statement stating one brand of vehicle is more reliable than the other.
 
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Correus

Adventurer
It figures, I really like the old rovers but it doesn’t sound like one would be a good choice. I have to have surgery on my neck and per the surgeon half of my lower back needs to be fused. I guess i’ll Have to find another vehicle. Thank you everyone.
It is possible to do, just wouldn't recommend it. SWMBO's back tends to bother her as well so I kept that in mind while making the rebuild plans. I've replaced the old leaf springs (they were bad) with RM parabolics and better shocks. Were also replacing the original seats (but keeping them) with a new set of deluxe seats - they are cushier.

Still - the old Rovers "shake rattle and roll". In the Rover line you might want to look at the Disco, RR or even a Defender. Keep in mind though, Defenders can be quite expensive, but if you hunt you can find them for less.
 

Correus

Adventurer
I worked with a guy that had some serious back issues. He had a Wrangler he didn't want to give up. He found a suspension seat and a doorstep that drops down when he opens the door. It works very well for him.

I have back issues but not very severe. For me the biggest deal is how low the seat is to the floorboard. If my knees have to be bent too much it bothers my back.

I can be comfortable all day long my Jeep Wrangler but I had a Chevy Cobalt its seats were low to the floor board and it would hurt my back after about 20.

For me it's not about how soft or hard to seat is, it's about the angle of my knees when I sit. What works for one person may not work for another.

As far as reliability, I had a 2004 4Runner with a 4.0 that had head issues at a hundred seventy thousand miles. it was common in the 2004 4Runners when they switch to 4.0 to have these issues. It's kind of hard to make a blanket statement stating one brand of vehicle is more reliable than the other.
ROTFLMAO!!!

Sorry, not laughing at you, what you said reminds me of a Series Rover complaint I've heard and seen that's rather funny - leg room.

I don't often hear people mention the angle, as you have, when it comes to comfort vs pain. What I hear/see are people who complain that their knees are in their ears because there's little leg room in old Series Rovers. I just don't know how people who are 5'10" or taller do it! They look absolutely crammed into it. I watched a video of a guy who was about 6'5" drive a SI Rover - his elbows were fighting his knees just to make a turn!
 

J!m

Active member
I’m 6-2 and using higher seats helps a lot. Also in the Defender since it’s about the same inside.
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
Find some local 'samples', as in other owners who have a vehicle that might work, and ask them for some seat time. Get a feel for the overall fit of the vehicle to your body/frame and reduce the list from there.

Thinking a short wheel base vehicle probably wouldn't work as ride quality suffers. Also need more interior room to allow for a better seat selection. Personally I think the toyota 4runners are cramped. I would stay away from a Defender, a Disco I with correct springs would be likely be OK, the RRC and RRC LWB would be even better as they offer upgraded seats and springs can be purchased for the desired load and ride quality. The LR3/4 are another step up from the RRC. Then there are the latest Range Rovers ........... Depends on budget.
 

LR Max

Local Oaf
LR3s are now "old rovers". You can pick up a LR3 or LR4 for well under the Toyota mark up.

Great vehicles and very comfortable. I took a trip last year out west. ~10 days in the saddle with my dad. He has a bad lower back. He was comfortable and had no issues. Overall its been very reliable. I typically let it sit for a month then use the crap out of it. I just have "15 year old 125k" issues. My next big replacement is suspension pieces and wheel bearings. I could probably drive another 6 months on it but I prefer staying ahead on my repairs.

Having owned a toyota, yes parts are cheaper than rover but at 100k, cars need shocks and if the previous owner drove around on out-of-round tires, then you need bushings, etc.

Everyone is afraid of air suspension but its been very good for me. I have one issue with a strut right now, but its manageable and really only is a problem off road.

I'd say look at a LR3, LR4, or a Full size Range rover in the 07-09 years. Look for something that has been serviced and is rust free. Also check here for info on common items. They are heavy on maintenance but in return you get a fantastic vehicle. Also I am able to do all the repairs on my own and order parts from England (WAY WAY WAY cheaper). This knocks down cost of ownership. But expect a decent service interval every 30k.

After owning a LR3, I wouldn't waste my time with any rover before 2005. Yes they are iconic but the pain and misery isn't worth it.
 

Correus

Adventurer
LR3s are now "old rovers". You can pick up a LR3 or LR4 for well under the Toyota mark up.

Great vehicles and very comfortable. I took a trip last year out west. ~10 days in the saddle with my dad. He has a bad lower back. He was comfortable and had no issues. Overall its been very reliable. I typically let it sit for a month then use the crap out of it. I just have "15 year old 125k" issues. My next big replacement is suspension pieces and wheel bearings. I could probably drive another 6 months on it but I prefer staying ahead on my repairs.

Having owned a toyota, yes parts are cheaper than rover but at 100k, cars need shocks and if the previous owner drove around on out-of-round tires, then you need bushings, etc.

Everyone is afraid of air suspension but its been very good for me. I have one issue with a strut right now, but its manageable and really only is a problem off road.

I'd say look at a LR3, LR4, or a Full size Range rover in the 07-09 years. Look for something that has been serviced and is rust free. Also check here for info on common items. They are heavy on maintenance but in return you get a fantastic vehicle. Also I am able to do all the repairs on my own and order parts from England (WAY WAY WAY cheaper). This knocks down cost of ownership. But expect a decent service interval every 30k.

After owning a LR3, I wouldn't waste my time with any rover before 2005. Yes they are iconic but the pain and misery isn't worth it.
LOL - and yet your profile pic is of a SIII 109!!

To each his own.
 
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