School me on the topic of toilets ;)

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
The current design in a wet bathroom may need a cover to prevent water from entering the toilet. The only downside is that the poop may become wetted and slow the drying process.
Please permit a comment, based on two years of use. If your toilet leaks and the feces get wet, your problem is not that it will slow the drying process, the problem is that you will have serious odor problems and you will have to dump within days, not weeks. If your toilet is not specifically designed to work in a wet bath, don't put it there. (FWIW: The "FitRV" couple have had so much trouble with their Air Head toilet - not Nature's Head - in a wet bath that they remove it from the bathroom every time they shower.)

The ONLY time we have had any odor with a Nature's Head was when the seal between the top and bottom came loose.

And as to the smell when dumping urine, it is not pleasant, but it is so much less than the smell of dumping a cassette.
:Wow1:
 

Ramdough

Adventurer
From my understanding, the Separrett does not do much composting in the toilet. The primary function in my opinion is to dry the poop to reduce odors (as you say) and hold a large quantity. The drying process reduces odors, weight, and volume. All are good in this case.

I spoke with Separrett about the wet bath. They said they may at a later point update their design to make it better for resisting water infiltration. Maybe that problem will be eventually solved in a future version. If that update never comes, I think I would still be ok with some sort of "rain cover" to keep the water out.

Just my thoughts.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
As discussed ...

endlessly. All urine separating, desiccating toilets do minimal actual composting. The benefit comes from keeping the ammonia out of the feces, which reduces the odor, and from reducing the volume by drying out the feces. The result is that you are dumping dry dirt as opposed to wet, smelly feces. Really that simple.

The Nature's Head can be successfully used in a wet bath; others cannot. If you have a wet bath, you will probably be happier with a unit that seals properly. If not, you will have to remove it or fabricate a waterproof cover. Sounds like you are trying to justify a product that is designed for a dry cabin and not a wet bath in a camper.

I took the easy way out. YMMV
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
Another possibility if folks are in the design stages of a camper, is to have a stand-alone shower, with a compost toilet in a roll-out drawer.

Even folks with an existing wet bath, you could simply remove the toilet, and install in a drawer somewhere else.

Neither are ideal from a space constraint standpoint, but it solves a few issues with regards to moisture and composting toilets.

yet more reasons why we opted against a shower for ours. The amount of space it takes up is hard to justify.


When I built our camper, I had a composting toilet in mind, but didnt want to spend the $$

So I built it to fit one, but added a false floor in the drawer to elevate the cheapo chemical toilet.

False floor created some extra storage space for chemicals, TP, etc. :ylsmoke:


 

javajoe79

Fabricator
If I fabricate one or buy a natures head, I am planning on building it into the lower cabinet structure with a removable panel to access it for service and possibly a hinged counter top above it for access when actually using it. This way it completely disappears when not it use.
 

Ramdough

Adventurer
endlessly. All urine separating, desiccating toilets do minimal actual composting. The benefit comes from keeping the ammonia out of the feces, which reduces the odor, and from reducing the volume by drying out the feces. The result is that you are dumping dry dirt as opposed to wet, smelly feces. Really that simple.

The Nature's Head can be successfully used in a wet bath; others cannot. If you have a wet bath, you will probably be happier with a unit that seals properly. If not, you will have to remove it or fabricate a waterproof cover. Sounds like you are trying to justify a product that is designed for a dry cabin and not a wet bath in a camper.

I took the easy way out. YMMV
I am not taking a dump on your toilet . I think it is a fine product that appears to be well made.

I don't like that I have to handle a pee bottle daily or every few days. I have to mount the toilet away from the wall to flip the lid up. I have to remove the top, unbolt the bottom, and dump the contents into a compost pile, hole, or biodegradable bag. I have to add filler materials.

The only negative of the Separrett that I see (for my particular installation) is that if water is sprayed at the seat lid, some may find its way into the poo container and make it more stinky. For me, from a specification stand point, I like the Separrett better. I can either mount the toilet on a slide like someone here mentioned. I can cover it when showering, I can make a dry bathroom, I can wait for the next version where they say they will address the water infiltration concern. All of these options and concerns are better for me than the negatives I see in the Nature's Head.

I have listed the things I dislike about the different models. It is a compromise. Some negative aspects can be mitigated, others cannot. I could hard plumb the pee bottle on NH, but I still have the other negatives that I cannot change. It sounds easier to prevent water from entering a toilet than redesigning a toilet.

I am open to further information and opinions, but I have yet to hear an argument that suggests that I should change my mind.






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
If you drill past the marketing hype, you will find that both toilets are the same - you still have to dump, you still have to drain (either a removable bottle or a remote tank, which you can attach to a Nature's Head), you still have to vent, and they will both fail, badly, if the feces get wet. If you add peat moss or similar, the toilet will go longer between dumps as the feces will dry faster; leave it out and you have the opposite effect. Stir the material and it drys faster, let it sit and it drys more slowly.

Put either of these in a dry bath and it is almost impossible for either to go wrong. The only reason that my comments are worth considering is that I have been using one of the products you are considering since 2013. (And have managed to find most of the possible failures during that time!)

Your money, your choice. :) The 9010 is a lot more expensive and does not appear on the US website. Of course, if you are in Europe, the Nature's Head may be more expensive. For lowest cost and clever use of off-the-shelf materials, consider the C-Head: http://www.c-head.com

Install either properly and I suspect that you will be much happier than you would be with a cassette or black tank.
 

The Artisan

Adventurer
One thing I don't like about composting toilets from what I can tell, is you can not throw TP in it unless is biode and I have seen that thin one ply. The dryflush with the urine separator would be ideal....
Kevin
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
Actually, you can and you don't need to use special paper as there are no valves to plug, etc. It will, however, fill the container faster and the mixture will be much less attractive. (Only an issue if you are spreading somewhere.)

We prefer to put toilet paper in the trash, easier, but your choice.

But I've had my say. I'm outta here.
:)
 

The Artisan

Adventurer


We prefer to put toilet paper in the trash, easier, but your choice.

But I've had my say. I'm outta here.
:)
Ha, I am trying to get my wife to go camping when my pod is done. I don't think that would be a plus telling her she has to throw her TP in a trashcan. Selling her on the composting toilet idea is already a chore...
Kevin
 

dwh

Tail-End Charlie
One thing I don't like about composting toilets from what I can tell, is you can not throw TP in it unless is biode and I have seen that thin one ply. The dryflush with the urine separator would be ideal....
Kevin
According to the FAQ at the Sun-Mar link I posted (which is the only actual composting toilet discussed in this thread so far), no special TP is required.

For the non-composting urine-separating toilets...you're gonna end up tossing a bag of crap in a dumpster, so it doesn't matter what paper you use. Use $100 bills if you want. :)
 
Top