Sewing Thread....A discussion on making your own adventure textile gear.

krick3tt

Adventurer
Your ability to make things that are available from retail outlets is a huge plus. You can save a large amount of money doing this. The size of bag you made is also available from a company in OZ called Drifta. I purchased one to replace my stock OZTent bag and it is really superior to the original.
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
OK, here's a topic I'd like to hear from the experts on:

Sewing folding or semi-rigid containers. I'm talking stuff like the Front Runner Flat-Pack Storage cubes, or the various organizer/storage cubes from Ikea or any of a million Chinese firms - the kind of thing with panel inserts to help them keep their shape.

I have a set of the FR Flat-pack cubes, but they're just too tall to fit under the bed/bunk in my van after recent rework, and they weren't perfectly sized anyhow. At the moment, I'm using an Ikea "Skubb" (underbed zippered soft-box), which fits, but it isn't perfectly sized either, leaving unused cubic inches. The Ikea and Chinese stuff is also cheap as hell, which I don't love. It's a good thing the Skubb was like $6 (so I bought a 2nd one) since the first is already coming apart at one seam where it got man-handled a bit.

I don't necessarily need the "Fold Flat" capability, but I'm looking to sew my own such cubes to maximize the available dimensions and use heartier materials and construction.

I sew "OK". I have a weak hobby machine, but with good needles and patience I've been able to sew canvas and upholstery fabric for a few jobs including HD seat covers for our bench/bed. I can handle sewing a "box", and I think I can figure out the steps for a zippered lid, but once I add in making lined panels with a stiffener, I start to lose the ability to visualize the steps...
 

The Artisan

Adventurer
Sew your fabric cube then come back and put your plastic liner in on the sides and sew your top. You can also cut out your plastic and sew your materials on both sides leaving seams to sew your cube together. Another option is glue all your materials to your plastic and repeat steps above.
Kevin
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Sew your fabric cube then come back and put your plastic liner in on the sides and sew your top. You can also cut out your plastic and sew your materials on both sides leaving seams to sew your cube together. Another option is glue all your materials to your plastic and repeat steps above.
Kevin
Yeah, my initial thought was to make all the panels by sewing the outer/stiffener/liner sandwiches first, then build the cube. But where my brain starts to hurt is trying to visualize if I'll be able to sew it inside-out and invert it after sewing, as I would with a normal fabric cube. I think I'll have enough range of motion at the joints that it'll still work, but that's where I get nervous.
 

The Artisan

Adventurer
Yeah, my initial thought was to make all the panels by sewing the outer/stiffener/liner sandwiches first, then build the cube. But where my brain starts to hurt is trying to visualize if I'll be able to sew it inside-out and invert it after sewing, as I would with a normal fabric cube. I think I'll have enough range of motion at the joints that it'll still work, but that's where I get nervous.
Should be no issues to flip inside out I assume you will do a perimter zipper like a suitcase?
Kevin
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Should be no issues to flip inside out I assume you will do a perimter zipper like a suitcase?
Kevin
+1 for rapid prototyping. I just did a test assembly of the luggage I was planning to make using Coroplast and tape - No, it can't be inverted once all the sides are attached, even with a fully open 6th face (no lid). That experiment, however, did lead me to the solution - I'm just going to sew my rectangular bag, and if I need more structure in the sides/bottom, I can just friction-fit coroplast stiffeners into the bag. I got a great deal on some 12oz bull denim, so I'm going to do one with just that and see how it comes out. I may also just add some stiff interfacing and call it good...
 

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Louisd75

Adventurer
I was checking out canoe paddle bags from Frost River and Duluth Pack and figured it would be a good first time project for the new Sailrite LSZ that I picked up. It's basically a layer of 10 oz waxed canvas with a layer of cotton flannel sewn to it. There's another layer of cotton flannel to act as a divider, then another layer of cotton flannel sewn to the final layer of waxed canvas. This gave me two pockets so that the bag could hold two paddles. I covered the edges with nylon webbing using the swing away binder attachment, which made the process waaaay easier than trying to fold it over and hold it. I strayed from the original paddle bag design by using a piece of webbing and a buckle for closure. The original design used a tied top that would have been difficult to use for my planned installation in my truck canopy. Unfortunately I didn't grab any pictures prior to installation, but here's what it looks like in the truck:

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I put in six grommets though I wound up only using four. I'll run it like this for a bit and see if the extra grommets are needed. The paddle bag bolts right into tracks installed on the ceiling of the canopy.

I picked up 10yds of the waxed canvas and have already cut pieces for three more paddle bags (Two more for the truck, the other one as a gift). I've got a bunch of little projects planned such as custom tool rolls, shoe pouches for the teardrop and 1gallon water jug covers w/ handles.
 

shade

Well-known member
I was checking out canoe paddle bags from Frost River and Duluth Pack and figured it would be a good first time project for the new Sailrite LSZ that I picked up. It's basically a layer of 10 oz waxed canvas with a layer of cotton flannel sewn to it. There's another layer of cotton flannel to act as a divider, then another layer of cotton flannel sewn to the final layer of waxed canvas. This gave me two pockets so that the bag could hold two paddles. I covered the edges with nylon webbing using the swing away binder attachment, which made the process waaaay easier than trying to fold it over and hold it. I strayed from the original paddle bag design by using a piece of webbing and a buckle for closure. The original design used a tied top that would have been difficult to use for my planned installation in my truck canopy. Unfortunately I didn't grab any pictures prior to installation, but here's what it looks like in the truck:

View attachment 550499

View attachment 550500

View attachment 550501

I put in six grommets though I wound up only using four. I'll run it like this for a bit and see if the extra grommets are needed. The paddle bag bolts right into tracks installed on the ceiling of the canopy.

I picked up 10yds of the waxed canvas and have already cut pieces for three more paddle bags (Two more for the truck, the other one as a gift). I've got a bunch of little projects planned such as custom tool rolls, shoe pouches for the teardrop and 1gallon water jug covers w/ handles.
Well done. What are you using for wax? I used a bar of Otter Wax on a heavy canvas coat and it seems to be working well a year later.
 

Louisd75

Adventurer
Well done. What are you using for wax? I used a bar of Otter Wax on a heavy canvas coat and it seems to be working well a year later.
I took the easy way out, the fabric came waxed:
 

Louisd75

Adventurer
Well done. What are you using for wax? I used a bar of Otter Wax on a heavy canvas coat and it seems to be working well a year later.
Oh, and thanks for the heads up on Otter Wax. I hadn't heard about it before and it looks like it would be perfect for an old coat of mine 👍
 

Louisd75

Adventurer
Still playing around with the new machine and working through the waxed canvas I picked up. First up is a shoe bag for the teardrop trailer. I've actually made two of 'em, one of each side of the trailer. They're designed to snap to the trailer frame below the door so that we have a water resistant place to drop our dirty shoes. They'll hold the shoes up off the ground so that we can reach them from inside the trailer. There's a flap that folds over the shoe opening to help minimize water getting in:

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Hope to get the snaps installed on the trailer after Thanksgiving.

Next I started working on water jug covers. I've been a big fan of the 1 gallon plastic jugs that are nearly ubiquitous at any grocery store or gas station. I like them because they're easier to use and store than a 5 gallon jug, easy to refill, inexpensive, easy to see if they've gotten funky inside and, if they leak, you're only out a gallon. In all the years I've been using them I've only had a couple of leaks. The major design issue I have with them is the handles break off pretty easily. Here's my proof-of-concept jug holder. It's 10oz canvas with a cotton flannel lining and a nylon webbing handle:

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One down, nine more to go! :)

Edited to add:
I went with the cotton flannel lining inside for cushioning and so that if I need to cool things off I can flip the bottle holder inside out and soak it for evaporative cooling.
 
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