Sewing Thread....A discussion on making your own adventure textile gear.

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Where is a good place to buy the heavier fabrics? I am in Austin. Are local shops likely to have this stuff? When I took my machine in the local shop, I didn't see much besides garment and quilting fabrics.
Joannes and Hobby Lobby usually have canvas and 500D nylon in their bulk fabric selection. Can get expensive by the yard so wait for their sales/coupons.

Look up auto interior repair, tent/awning makers or boat cover makers in Austin. If they have a store front, they may have a selection of heavy canvas or vinyl they will sell by the yard. Also, if there is a large textile repair/manufacturing indistry in Austin there will be industrial fabric supply companies around town.

Also, if you have a Cabelas or Bass Pro, and they have bargain barn return center They will sell returned tents, pop up tent covers, canvas tarps, etc.....at deep discounts and I've reuse the canvas and zippers before.

Lastly, if you want heavy duty waxed canvas, simply go to the local hardware farm and ranch store and buy pre-made waxed tarps or painters drop cloths and cut them up. This can actually be alot cheaper by the yard then ordering it on-line.

I now buy canvas and Cordura nylon in 2000+ yard quantities (60 to 100 yards per roll) monthly by the pallet but those supply companies normally won't sell remnant or cut rolls so you'd have to buy a minimum of 60-100 yards plus shipping.

I will sometimes have "drops" of leftover materials that I store up for small projects and normally would be happy to let you have some but, since moving into our design shop I got rid of alot of it.

Good luck!
 
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Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Where is a good place to buy the heavier fabrics?
I haven't ordered anything from Big Duck Canvas, but they carry heavy canvas and waxed canvas, as well as other fabrics:
+1 for Big Duck Canvas from me - For my last big luggage project, I bought 5 yards of 12oz bull denim at $2.99/yd that was "factory second" due to "slight color inconsistencies". I'd been planning to wax the fabric anyhow, so a little mottling wouldn't have been a big deal, but when it arrived, I couldn't even detect what they were seeing. (Possibly it's an issue on the master bolt so I might have seen it if I'd ordered much more yardage).

I wish I'd bought more! The shipping was almost as much as the fabric, and the surplus from that project has been used for a bunch of tool rolls and other fun things.
 

alexcivick

Observer
+1 for Big Duck Canvas from me - For my last big luggage project, I bought 5 yards of 12oz bull denim at $2.99/yd that was "factory second" due to "slight color inconsistencies". I'd been planning to wax the fabric anyhow, so a little mottling wouldn't have been a big deal, but when it arrived, I couldn't even detect what they were seeing. (Possibly it's an issue on the master bolt so I might have seen it if I'd ordered much more yardage).

I wish I'd bought more! The shipping was almost as much as the fabric, and the surplus from that project has been used for a bunch of tool rolls and other fun things.
Big Duck Canvas has been a problematic resource for me over the past couple of years. The fabrics they have are quality but they almost never have what I need in stock. I primarily go to Big Duck for 1000D canvas but it is hit or miss if they have any of a certain color or any color at all and the shipping cost is often prohibitive especially when you order smaller quantities.
Right now I am struggling to find a good resource for heavier cotton canvas. I've been experimenting with the lighter-weight canvas that is readily available and interfacing to better stabilize but it's a lot of extra processes and is only suitable for my smaller travel bags. It doesn't cut it for the gear bags.

For now, the best practice has been to pay the premium on heavy canvas from SailRite or Big Duck Canvas. If you are making personal projects (which is what SailRite caters to) it's still a good option because whatever you make can still cost less per item than buying the same retail and buying in bulk leaves you excess material to make more. If you are making a production item to sell that markup can sting pretty good sometimes. If you think the cost of fabric is expensive wait until you need to buy hardware.....

Most of my products are leather goods and fortunately have good resources with wholesale pricing. I used to order some hardware in bulk from Amazon until I found out that if I order from that same supplier directly they offer better pricing and discount options and even offer more inventory options so that is something to look out for.

Ripstop by the Roll has been a good resource for lightweight stuff mostly used in hiking. Ultralight fabrics and plastic hardware https://ripstopbytheroll.com/
It's been a while since I've ordered from them but Rocky Woods Fabrics was a great place https://www.rockywoods.com/
Outdoor Wilderness Fabrics has been helpful in the past as well https://www.owfinc.com/
Not sure if they are still in operation but maybe worth a look
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Can't really show all the sewing details (due to being knocked off) but, I've spent the last year or so developing and testing the new ATC RMR3 line of Pro series bags and wanted to share some of the detail work!

The RMR3 line (Rocky Mountain Respond, Rescue and Recovery) is designed for the First Responder, Agent, Officer, Operator, SAR's Professional that has to have gear assembled and ready to go on a moments notice.

You'll see some typical ATC design cues in the photos but, lmk if you have any technical assembly questions. Cheers.

0419CB96-4ABF-44E6-8356-CD0732A36019.jpeg2507DC93-1C03-43D2-8DD4-31135BBAEC88.jpeg
 

alexcivick

Observer
Can't really show all the sewing details (due to being knocked off) but, I've spent the last year or so developing and testing the new ATC RMR3 line of Pro series bags and wanted to share some of the detail work!

The RMR3 line (Rocky Mountain Respond, Rescue and Recovery) is designed for the First Responder, Agent, Officer, Operator, SAR's Professional that has to have gear assembled and ready to go on a moments notice.

You'll see some typical ATC design cues in the photos but, lmk if you have any technical assembly questions. Cheers.

View attachment 744847View attachment 744848
That’s amazing. Do you have a bartacker for the webbing and attachment loops? I love the little American flag labels I have been trying to find Texas flag ones for made in Texas. Looks great.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
That’s amazing. Do you have a bartacker for the webbing and attachment loops? I love the little American flag labels I have been trying to find Texas flag ones for made in Texas. Looks great.
Great eye on the B tack! These are pre-production testing bags. As we assemble them they spend most of the time on the machine. The final run will incorporate b-tacking from our Juki bar tack machine!

Cool question…..got any examples of your gear?
 

taugust

Adventurer
After months in the shop, where they didn't do anything, I finally got my machine back and working.

They put WD-40 on some of the linkages and let it sit, to no avail. The reverse button was stuck pushed in, and the motor wiring wasn't correct.. They did put a new drive belt and bobbin winder tire on, and sold me a new foot pedal and motor/light block. They did not charge any labor because the never really did anything.

The repair guy was very helpful, and spent about an hour answering my questions on how to approach things.

I asked some questions on a Vintage Japanese SM FB group, and with their help, got it operational myself. I freed up the stuck linkages and rewired the motor and controller. I also found an instruction manual online. It now runs smoothly and sews very nicely.

Now to get some heavier fabrics and start some projects.
 

Attachments

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
After months in the shop, where they didn't do anything, I finally got my machine back and working.

They put WD-40 on some of the linkages and let it sit, to no avail. The reverse button was stuck pushed in, and the motor wiring wasn't correct.. They did put a new drive belt and bobbin winder tire on, and sold me a new foot pedal and motor/light block. They did not charge any labor because the never really did anything.

The repair guy was very helpful, and spent about an hour answering my questions on how to approach things.

I asked some questions on a Vintage Japanese SM FB group, and with their help, got it operational myself. I freed up the stuck linkages and rewired the motor and controller. I also found an instruction manual online. It now runs smoothly and sews very nicely.

Now to get some heavier fabrics and start some projects.
Man, that's a clean looking machine, surprised that it didn't run. Almost sounds like it was gummed up from lack of use. Cool to have it running now!

Be sure to post up your projects! Let us know if you have any questions. Good luck!
 

taugust

Adventurer
Yes, it absolutely was gummed up from lack of use, but only the reverse mechanism and the stitch length dial. Some repeated applications of PB Blaster and gentle heat from a heat gun gradually got it freed up over a week's time of occasional work. It also needed adjustment of the feed dog plate, as that was striking the back of the frame. Someone posted a photo from the service manual and that was an easy fix. It had a brownish film coating a lot to the inside and some outside components. Not sure if that is old oil, or nicotine, but I cleaned it off the exterior and some of the interior. I may go back and do a more thorough cleaning, I but want to start working with it.

My brother told me that my mom's machine would be fully dipped in a tank to do a complete cleaning years ago. I asked my local repair guy, and he says no one does that now, as the solvent was hazardous. The repair shop where my mom had it done is out of business. Any idea what they used to use for that? My thought was something like benzene, since that is now banned.
 

taugust

Adventurer
First project was a simple one, but I have needed them for over a year. This is part of what prompted me to get a machine.

I use a lumbar cushion when I drive. Healthy Back used to sell covers for their cushions, but now they don't. Top is the cushion and the old cover. My other cover is almost as bad.

Bottom are three of the four covers I made from worn out Duluth Trading firehose pants. Cut the bottom of the legs, sew a seam to close one end, and done. Already hemmed. 😀
 

Attachments

ITTOG

Well-known member
Can't really show all the sewing details (due to being knocked off) but, I've spent the last year or so developing and testing the new ATC RMR3 line of Pro series bags and wanted to share some of the detail work!

The RMR3 line (Rocky Mountain Respond, Rescue and Recovery) is designed for the First Responder, Agent, Officer, Operator, SAR's Professional that has to have gear assembled and ready to go on a moments notice.

You'll see some typical ATC design cues in the photos but, lmk if you have any technical assembly questions. Cheers.

View attachment 744847View attachment 744848
Is this going to be a backpack or a handbag? If a backpack, I may be interested in one given it looks like there is a sleeve for a laptop.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Is this going to be a backpack or a handbag? If a backpack, I may be interested in one given it looks like there is a sleeve for a laptop.
Great question and I'll get your opinion.

It's designed to have both. The first release will be with a shoulder strap. The second version is currently being tested with stow away backpack straps and shoulder strap. Current feedback is 50/50. Some guys love the option and utility (BP Straps allow for soft armor inserts to face forward more functionally and super convenient to carry with things in your hands) But, when stowed they impact the way (comfort) the bag is carried via the shoulder strap.

I see it both ways. And, of course there's a price difference to add BP straps.

It's truly a "working bag" for those that need the functionality and options it provides so, it may not suit some.

Thanks! and, hope to have some up pre-Christmas.
 
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ITTOG

Well-known member
I am biased because I use a backpack for work. I transitioned from a hand bag years ago. I hand bag just doesn't work well, for me, when traveling through airports because I need and want my hands free.

I work in an office environment and I would guess 75% of people below 50 years old use a backpack. Thus, I think the trend is indicating hand bags are slowly fading into our memories.
 

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