Sewing Thread....A discussion on making your own adventure textile gear.

BritKLR

Explorer
We have a Sailrite LZ1 that we bought years ago to do canvas work on the sailboat. Just finished a replacement dodger for the cockpit. Not anywhere near perfect but was way cheaper than having one made. One nice thing about Sailrite are all the videos they have for free about various sewing projects (if you are new to sewing you should check them out, mainly revolves around sailing but a lot of the techniques are the same). They also have some nice attachments for the machine that help make things a bit easier for the novice. When we get to the point of interior cushions for the RV we are building I am planning on giving those a try. Also will make a motorcycle cover for the Kawasaki Sherpa that will live outside on the rear rack.
This is an excellent example of what these types of forums/threads are about and the sharing of knowledge, information and tips! While I'm familiar with the Sailrite machines I had no clue about their tutorial sewing videos. If you haven't seen them, take a moment and look through them.....some great stuff!

Thanks for the tip VerMonsterRV!
 
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rayra

Expedition Leader
yep, Sailrite vids are very helpful, akin to 1A Auto Part's vehicle repair vids

When I can finally lay hands on a sturdy machine, I have a hobie cat -style fabric vehicle roof shade / deck I need to sew using 1000D cordura and 1" webbing for edge reinforcement.

I've also long been looking at the Harbor Freight folding 4'x8' trailer for several uses, they're made to fold up and move around on their own integral casters, like a folding ping pong table. I'd keep it on the side of the house under a garage roof overhang and want to make a weather-resistent fitted cover for it.

I also need to sew up a fitted cab / windshield cover for my old pickup and a couple fitted tire covers. Thing just sits in my driveway 360 days a year.
 

GregSplett

Adventurer
My old singer Has the original work station and motor from like 1920?I forget. My owners manual is actually a Juki manual from their clone, given to me by the shop that tuned it up for me. My machine, unfortunately, is caught up in the lost years of Singer documentation. I am very lucky to have an upholstery supply store nearby that is super knowledgable and friendly. Anyways it has no speed controller just a peddle operated dry clutch. You have to feather the clutch to have any resemblance of speed control. Add to that it has no reverse. Add to that this thing is geared pretty fast and the walking foot is capable of 3/8" No "speed is not your friend".LOL
All great points. Also, having a machine that you can control the speed of the motor so that you can constantly control the fabric and feed rate helps. Speed isn't always your friend.
 

Verkstad

Raggarkung
Does its presserfoot also come down only when actuating the pedal too ? Those can make for a lively experience sewing...
Sounds like you have an industrial machine of some kind.
If you want an fun project, you could fit a variablespeed motor and separate clutch control.
My old singer Has the original work station and motor from like 1920?I forget. My owners manual is actually a Juki manual from their clone, given to me by the shop that tuned it up for me. My machine, unfortunately, is caught up in the lost years of Singer documentation. I am very lucky to have an upholstery supply store nearby that is super knowledgable and friendly. Anyways it has no speed controller just a peddle operated dry clutch. You have to feather the clutch to have any resemblance of speed control. Add to that it has no reverse. Add to that this thing is geared pretty fast and the walking foot is capable of 3/8" No "speed is not your friend".LOL
 

BritKLR

Explorer
My old singer Has the original work station and motor from like 1920?I forget. My owners manual is actually a Juki manual from their clone, given to me by the shop that tuned it up for me. My machine, unfortunately, is caught up in the lost years of Singer documentation. I am very lucky to have an upholstery supply store nearby that is super knowledgable and friendly. Anyways it has no speed controller just a peddle operated dry clutch. You have to feather the clutch to have any resemblance of speed control. Add to that it has no reverse. Add to that this thing is geared pretty fast and the walking foot is capable of 3/8" No "speed is not your friend".LOL
I can relate, my REX that I just retired had the massive Clutch Motor. It was a perfectly fine system for years. For around $100 you can replace the clutch motor with a viable speed servo motor. The great thing is a servo motor infinitely more controllable (speed) and isn't constantly running (saves electricity) and it's quieter and less fatiguing. No Reverse would be a challenge. Good luck.
 

Driftwood77

New member
Sailmaker here. Also make boat covers, mend horse rugs and do leather work.
I have a Durcopp and a Singer industrial machines and a Jones and Singer domestic machines.
I think you will find that seam tape will not stick to Ultrasil or any coated material like that.
 

GregSplett

Adventurer
I can relate, my REX that I just retired had the massive Clutch Motor. It was a perfectly fine system for years. For around $100 you can replace the clutch motor with a viable speed servo motor. The great thing is a servo motor infinitely more controllable (speed) and isn't constantly running (saves electricity) and it's quieter and less fatiguing. No Reverse would be a challenge. Good luck.
I looked into a speed controller but I decided to just make do.No reverse means I have to stop with the needle down in the work and spin the work around on the table to lock stitch. IIs what it is. The singer probably comes out twice a year realistically.
 
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