Show me your "Adult" rigs and how you keep them running.

AFBronco235

Crew Chief
I wasn't sure where to post this so here goes.

In celebration of all things old and still going strong, I'm wanting to see the rigs out there old enough to be considered an adult. (18+ years for most areas.) And how you manage to keep them running in these "modern" times. Little add-ons like radios/CD players, new engines, seats, whatever. I want to prove that just because its newer, doesn't mean its better.

And to start off with, my 91' Bronco. Born in Aug of 1990, it is almost 24 years old. (I've dated women younger than that.)

I've updated it with an 8,000 lb. winch, dual battery setup, custom center console, CB radio, drop down TV w/ a DVD/CD player and a roof rack.

It will be 24 years old this Aug. Old enough to drink that alcohol mix gas we've got around here.




 

Zeep

Adventurer
^^^ Good looking rig. Here in the rust belt, any old Bronco, is as rare as hens teeth!
 

HotrodSmurf

Observer
I've got a 1994 Chevy K1500
20140216_115408.jpg
I've replaced the intake silencer with a piece of 4" tubing. Removed the heat riser (stuck closed). Cut the ridges off from around the throttle body bores and smoothed it out. Replaced the PO's god awful E3 spark plugs with some AC Delco stock replacements. Removed the spare tire from underneath to avoid destroying it and have it ratchet strapped to a tool box I bought off my brother for $30. Cranked the torsion bars up about 1", was taller initially but I brought it down to stay off the droop stops.

near future plans include some Summit plug wires (rebranded MSD super conductors), a headache rack, tool box that isn't rusting through its 3rd paint job with a permanent spare tire holder, bed tie downs made from unistrut, mounts for my shovel and ax.

been an excellent truck, much more capable than the jeep it replaced, and much less cramped.
 

SpongeX

Rust does a body good.


This old girl is 35 and still running pretty much original everything.



This is my newest rig both in age and time with me. She will soon be 25 and will be undergoing an overhaul this winter to correct some age/prior owner issues.

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4x4junkie

Explorer
My 1990 Ford Bronco II:


Engine is original (ODO shows (1)85K, but is probably closer to an equivalent of 230K given the amount of time the rig spends in low range). Trans is a M5OD from a same-year Supercab Ranger, but is also running it's original innards. Axles are from an Explorer, which were needed to support the 35x12.50 tires.

Built it about 10 years ago, it's been a great rig (driven all up & down the west coast with it). Biggest issue to date was an output bearing in the trans that very gradually started making some noise, which I chose to just swap to a later (improved) design trans rather than repair it for almost the same cost). More recently I had a leaf in a rear spring break (rock crawling finally did it in I guess), and fixed a couple power steering leaks, and new body mount bushings, but overall I've been quite happy with it.



More in my sig link \/
 

the_dealer

Observer
Wow, 4x4junkie, u still wheeling that thing! I miss my 85b2, and really regret selling it.

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Wainiha

Explorer
AFBronco, what seat covers are those with the molles? I was just looking at BlueRidge Overland(I think that's the name). Not a seat cover but it has the molles.

I like your setup.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
One thing I find is helpful for old iron is high zinc motor oils. In my case I use Shell Rotella T6 that my local Wal-Mart stocks in 10W30. The modern oil formulations reduce the zinc content quite dramatically and the top ends of engines from 15, 20 and more years ago need zinc to reduce the wear. This is especially true of sorta modern engines like my 22R-E with overhead cams that'll eat themselves up without the cushioning. Zinc is added using ZDDP and the specs reduce the phosphorus content to the point they can't really add it anymore, at least in oils designed to work with catalytic converters under the API SM and SN specs.
 
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eggman918

Adventurer
My rig is almost a senior citizen at 46 years old I've owned it since 1990 and rebuilt it twice the second time adding a cummins 4BT 3.54 gears and truTracs front and rear and a 203/205 T case The trailer is based on a 1958 Alaskan camper so it is nearly qualified for social security! I've added a York compressor for OBA with a 7 gal. tank a ramsey 8K winch 65 gal fulel tank 2 spare tires full gauges mounted in an F-600 dash bucket seats in front moving the sliding bench to the rear that allows easy storage under and behind for lots of gear.An overhead console for AM/FM-SD card stereo with Bose speakers and a CB and soon a vintage under dash AC...actually there is very little that came from the factory in'68 still on the truck.The trailer is based on an 8' Alaskan camper that we upgraded the water tankage to 22 gallons and replaced the icebox with a frige and a small solar system to keep the batteries charged.They are both still "works in progress" but we are very happy with them so far I am getting ~16 mpg for the truck and trailer when loaded to 12,000 lbs combined weight which is 6 mpg better than the truck got empty with the 390 :Wow1:
Someday if I can ever afford it it will get paint and body work done but that is beyond my skill sets so it may be a long time before that happens but it is rock solid reliable as it sits so I can live with its rough looks









 

the_dealer

Observer
I like your rig alot. The wood panel interior is pretty sweet too. Is that house carpeting? I used some carpet left over from my remodel in my old b2 and loved it

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eggman918

Adventurer
Is that a "naughty pine" headliner?
Dog eared ceder fencing planed down to 1/4" with a T&G on the ends,it was over 48" in both directions so paneling would have required multiple joints and the fencing was on sale at the time and fairly easy to work with.I made 4 large garbage bags of shavings and gave them to a kid down the street that raised 4H rabbits in exchange for some fryers it was a true win-win.
 

AFBronco235

Crew Chief
AFBronco, what seat covers are those with the molles? I was just looking at BlueRidge Overland(I think that's the name). Not a seat cover but it has the molles.

I like your setup.
I got them from CoverKing.com. A bit pricey at around $200 for my set, but they fit extremely well and are a lot tougher than most seat covers I've seen. Plus it was still cheaper than getting them recovered and easier than replacing the seats. I keep tons of stuff on the backs with the molle setup. First aid kit, ropes, ratchets, basic emergency tools, water/hydration system, a couple different types of duck tape, small shovel and other odds and ends. The only problem I have is that there is so much stuff, that the seats no long fold forward on their own when I slid them up to get in the back, but I can live with that.

One thing I find is helpful for old iron is high zinc motor oils. In my case I use Shell Rotella T6 that my local Wal-Mart stocks in 10W30. The modern oil formulations reduce the zinc content quite dramatically and the top ends of engines from 15, 20 and more years ago need zinc to reduce the wear. This is especially true of sorta modern engines like my 22R-E with overhead cams that'll eat themselves up without the cushioning. Zinc is added using ZDDP and the specs reduce the phosphorus content to the point they can't really add it anymore, at least in oils designed to work with catalytic converters under the API SM and SN specs.
I'll have to remember that one. I've worked on old engines most of my life, but hadn't noticed the changes in zinc levels. I'll have to do some research before I buy into it, but its definitely worth looking into.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
I'll have to remember that one. I've worked on old engines most of my life, but hadn't noticed the changes in zinc levels. I'll have to do some research before I buy into it, but its definitely worth looking into.
It's supposedly a real thing with race engine builders seeing lifters not making it beyond break-in starting with SM-spec oil. ZDDP levels have been slowly reduced in each revision since the SF spec of 1500 PPM. My truck calls for SG spec oil, which is 1200 PPM min ZDDP and the current SM/SN spec is 800 PPM min (which doesn't mean the oil will be that low, just that it doesn't have to be higher). It's one of those things that you can't really point to specifically as a problem but might lead to shorter engine life. Or not.

I figure there's sufficient chemical justification for the level of ZDDP in oil that it's worth the effort to find an oil that is higher, particularly since it's a zero cost thing (and actually most of the time Rotella is a little cheaper than typical automobile oils) and therefore I see it as insurance. My engine in other ways does not tax the oil, lower compression, sufficient cooling, etc. that I don't really need the super high tech modern oils anyway.

http://www.enginebuildermag.com/2012/03/zddp-when-where-what-why-how/

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/1572367505-post1.html
 
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