Sounds like FORD’s going to offer another engine choice for the Tremor

AbleGuy

Officious Intermeddler
During the F-150 Tremor’s first two years of production, the rig was sold with only one single engine option – the twin-turbocharged Ford 3.5L V6 EcoBoost (kinda like the Raptor’s). except that the Tremor’s version was less powerful than the similar engine found in the Raptor.

Now though, industry sources have leaked info that the 2023 Ford F-150 Tremor will soon come with the naturally-aspirated Ford 5.0L V8 Coyote engine as it’s standard offering!


“A report from Ford Authority suggests the automaker…the 2023 F-150 Tremor will add the 5.0-liter Coyote V8 as the base engine. The 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6 with 400 horsepower and 500 pound-feet of torque, the only engine to be had in the current Tremor, will be the optional choice.

Elsewhere in the truck lineup, the Coyote V8 makes 400 hp and 410 lb-ft. The EcoBoost V6 maxes out at 14,000 pounds of towing, the V8 tops out at 13,000 pounds. The diminished output and capability lead one to believe the 2023 Tremor will offer a less expensive entry point than the current truck's $55,900 — before factoring in supply issues and inflation, never mind trying to find an example that hasn't been optioned into the mid $70K range….”
 
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Trixxx

Well-known member
From everything I’ve read, the 5.0L Is considerably less complex and more reliable. May not get the power or mpg, but when you’re out in the middle of nowhere, reliability goes a long ways..
 

Grassland

Well-known member
As far as power it really depends what you need the truck for.
I'm making due with 100 less HP and even worse for torque.
 

FordGuy1

Adventurer
I had ordered a 2022 F-150 Tremor that's due in next week. As soon as Ford announced the 5.0l in the Tremor I re-ordered first day. The 3.5 is a torque monster, but I just deal with too many issues every day on high milers, most are caused by lack of maint, But the 5.0l is just simple. Plus I can install a winch behind the stock bumper.
 

ace944gs

Member
Damn, I have a '21 tremor and would definitely have preferred the 5.0... it's nice to have that torque but I really have never needed it. A winch and a simplified engine >>> torque.
Plus, I could have saved a few $$$ it seems.
 

zoomad75

K5 Camper guy
It's funny how a lot of the masses just see the peak HP and TQ numbers and go nuts over them. But the torque and HP curves on a dyno graph really show the real story. The 3.5L sure makes the power, but the torque comes on much higher in the RPM curve vs the V8 Coyote. Not sure what year the graph represents, but I wouldn't be surprised if the current year curves are much different.




I agree that the 5.0 is a better choice for the reliability side of things. Less complexity not having the turbos and all that goes along with it. You won't be revving the snot out of it to get the power either.
 

Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
From everything I’ve read, the 5.0L Is considerably less complex and more reliable. May not get the power or mpg, but when you’re out in the middle of nowhere, reliability goes a long ways..
Agreed. The block is solid and not overstressed with twin turbos. We'll see how Toyota's small block twin turbos holds up to towing or carrying a popup with large tires.
 

Grassland

Well-known member
Looking at the Dyno charts, power and torque peaking is in the 3-5k range for both. I'm surprised the 5.0 comes on as early as it does for torque.
Is the first gear on the 10 speed super low?
I haven't looked at Tremor because I don't want a crew cab, but most 5.0 and 3.5 trucks I see in real life have 3.31 highway gears.
Can you get 3.73 final with the 3.5 even?
 

(none)

Adventurer
Looking at the Dyno charts, power and torque peaking is in the 3-5k range for both. I'm surprised the 5.0 comes on as early as it does for torque.
Is the first gear on the 10 speed super low?
I haven't looked at Tremor because I don't want a crew cab, but most 5.0 and 3.5 trucks I see in real life have 3.31 highway gears.
Can you get 3.73 final with the 3.5 even?
3.73 with 3.5l only with the max payload packages (long beds) or the powerboost i believe.

As you note, most appear to come with the 3.31. 3.55 with he 3.5l usually show up with the max tow or optioned. 5.0l comes with the 3.73l with max tow and can be had with smaller bed sizes.

I guess the big reliability mystery for the new 5.0 is the oil pump belt and the cylinder deactivation.
 

Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
3.73 with 3.5l only with the max payload packages (long beds) or the powerboost i believe.

As you note, most appear to come with the 3.31. 3.55 with he 3.5l usually show up with the max tow or optioned. 5.0l comes with the 3.73l with max tow and can be had with smaller bed sizes.

I guess the big reliability mystery for the new 5.0 is the oil pump belt and the cylinder deactivation.
It'll probably have the stall/start nonsense like the new 5.0's on the F-150's too.
 

FordGuy1

Adventurer
Looking at the Dyno charts, power and torque peaking is in the 3-5k range for both. I'm surprised the 5.0 comes on as early as it does for torque.
Is the first gear on the 10 speed super low?
I haven't looked at Tremor because I don't want a crew cab, but most 5.0 and 3.5 trucks I see in real life have 3.31 highway gears.
Can you get 3.73 final with the 3.5 even?
The 10 spd with its super low 1st and 2and really makes the 5.0 work, especially with towing. The older 6 spd, I would take the 3.5l.
 

FordGuy1

Adventurer
It'll probably have the stall/start nonsense like the new 5.0's on the F-150's too.
I believe the cylinder deactivation is not going to be a issue. It deactivates all cylinders in a pattern stopping the cylinder wall temp problem that GM had which created oil ring issues. Time will tell for sure. It can be turned off with a tuner BTW.
 

deserteagle56

Adventurer
But the torque and HP curves on a dyno graph really show the real story. The 3.5L sure makes the power, but the torque comes on much higher in the RPM curve vs the V8 Coyote.

I agree that the 5.0 is a better choice for the reliability side of things. Less complexity not having the turbos and all that goes along with it. You won't be revving the snot out of it to get the power either.
I'm a bit perplexed by the torque curves K&N came up with and it makes me wonder if they somehow modified the vehicles they tested (as in using K&N intakes).

I did a lot of research before buying my F150 with the 3.5 Ecoboost in 2016. One of the reasons I went with this engine were all the owners that were happy about how this engine towed WITHOUT needing to rev high as did the Coyote engine. I still follow the F150 forums and this still holds true. The 3.5 Ecoboost is known for "diesel-like" low rpm torque when pulling a load, whereas the Coyote needs to rev. That is the consensus of most of the owners. So how do I reconcile what the owners say (and my own experience) versus what is show on these torque graphs? It doesn't make sense. TFL did a test towing a load up I-70 in the Colorado mountains, comparing the 3.5 Ecoboost to the Coyote that you can find on line. They mention during that test how much more power the Ecoboost has at lower rpms than the V8. Going up that mountain the Ecoboost was running ~ 3000 rpm in 5th or 6th gear to maintain the speed limit. The V8 had to turn 4500 rpm to run that same speed, running in 3rd and 4th gear.

So it seems to me you'll be "revving the snot" out of the V8, not the V6. Real world results.
 

FordGuy1

Adventurer
I'm a bit perplexed by the torque curves K&N came up with and it makes me wonder if they somehow modified the vehicles they tested (as in using K&N intakes).

I did a lot of research before buying my F150 with the 3.5 Ecoboost in 2016. One of the reasons I went with this engine were all the owners that were happy about how this engine towed WITHOUT needing to rev high as did the Coyote engine. I still follow the F150 forums and this still holds true. The 3.5 Ecoboost is known for "diesel-like" low rpm torque when pulling a load, whereas the Coyote needs to rev. That is the consensus of most of the owners. So how do I reconcile what the owners say (and my own experience) versus what is show on these torque graphs? It doesn't make sense. TFL did a test towing a load up I-70 in the Colorado mountains, comparing the 3.5 Ecoboost to the Coyote that you can find on line. They mention during that test how much more power the Ecoboost has at lower rpms than the V8. Going up that mountain the Ecoboost was running ~ 3000 rpm in 5th or 6th gear to maintain the speed limit. The V8 had to turn 4500 rpm to run that same speed, running in 3rd and 4th gear.

So it seems to me you'll be "revving the snot" out of the V8, not the V6. Real world results.
The 3.5 makes a ton of torque, no comparison, A 100ft more than the 5.0, that is a lot. The relation between the two are a funny thing. The 5.0l will never tow as easy as the 3.5.
 

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