Stranded in a Snow Storm FACT CHEK

JaSAn

Well-known member
It used to be that news organizations would tell us what happened and we had to decide what we though about it.
Now they tell us what to think about an event and we have to decide what happened.
 

Mickey Bitsko

Adventurer
Comments on this thread are just like the article,opinion, designed to make you look and maybe buy some of their advertising. just like my opinion of the thread it's OPINION.
In my opinion, news articles are determined by the sensational value and how much can be exploited for ratings. television/media 99.99% ~make believe/fake.
Just like the weather reports, if they can make anything out of nothing to
sound sensational THAT is the desired effect.
Local news, do we really care that there was a high speed chase in the middle of the night, I'm not...but it's sensational
 
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jbaucom

Well-known member
Sounds nothing like professional journalists. The importance of the 4th Estate and the watchdog of government. The founding fathers understood this. The lose of media at the local level is even worse, no one watching what boards and commissions are doing is so scary!
I'm going WAY off-topic here. It seems like the media and electorate focus on the President, and then congress, but I'd venture to say that most folks couldn't name their county council members, though that handful of people are the ones who can most directly levy some pretty significant property taxes and are responsible for local economic growth and quality of life. Civic engagement at the local level is pathetic; only about 10% of eligible voters participate in local school and small-town municipal elections, and in the last contested mayoral race in our county seat, only about a quarter of eligible voters came to the polls. My vote barely matters in who becomes president, as that's determined by hundreds of thousands of other voters based on broader political issues across the state, but my vote can directly impact who sits on my local school board or fire commission.

Edited to add: Voting is important at all levels, but many people sit out local elections and neglect to make down-ballot selections because the only office they care about voting for is President and Vice President.
 
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plainjaneFJC

Deplorable
I'm going WAY off-topic here. It seems like the media and electorate focus on the President, and then congress, but I'd venture to say that most folks couldn't name their county council members, though that handful of people are the ones who can most directly levy some pretty significant property taxes and are responsible for local economic growth and quality of life. Civic engagement at the local level is pathetic; only about 10% of eligible voters participate in local school and small-town municipal elections, and in the last contested mayoral race in our county seat, only about a quarter of eligible voters came to the polls. My vote barely matters in who becomes president, as that's determined by hundreds of thousands of other voters based on broader political issues across the state, but my vote can directly impact who sits on my local school board or fire commission.

Edited to add: Voting is important at all levels, but many people sit out local elections and neglect to make down-ballot selections because the only office they care about voting for is President and Vice President.
If I haven’t researched a candidate out I follow the “vote the bums out” mantra. Everyone needs to get a real job every now and then
 

jbaucom

Well-known member
The article really just illustrates how important it is to not be one of those people who habitually wait as long as possible before refueling. I'd bet there was a higher percentage of ICE vehicle drivers who were worried about running out of gas than the percentage of EV drivers worried about draining their battery. Whether it is in a battery or liquid fuel, energy is energy, and you have to have enough of it to overcome whatever obstacle and/or distance lies between you and the next suitable energy source. The southern part of the U.S. generally does a poor job of preparing for winter weather hazards, especially when it comes to personal preparation. We're good at running to the store for bread and milk, but not so good at keeping a winter "kit" in the vehicle - blankets, food, beverages, hat and gloves- in case we're stranded somewhere for a day or so. Preparation is far more critical than the energy source of the vehicle you're driving (EV vs ICE). I rarely let the DTE on my truck drop below 200 miles. EV drivers have the benefit of "refueling" at home, so they can leave the house every day with a full "tank."
 

JaSAn

Well-known member
I agree with jbucom. But will add it is not just southern folks who are ill prepared for being stranded in winter, I see it in my neighbors in Minnesota. No stocking cap, no warm gloves, no boots, etc. stored in vehicle; let alone blankets and other stuff to make your 'camping' more endurable.
 
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