Stupid Radio Tricks

#1
Thought I would start a thread about cool things to do with your radios.

First thing I would start with is APRS;

http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/find.cgi?call=KI6AZC

I have my VHF unit hooked up to my GPS unit so that I can broadcast my position using APRS. This goes into a digipeater with an Internet link and you can track where I am on the web.

Useful if you have a group backcountry. If they are all running APRS, you can keep tabs on everyones location!

It also allows you to send packets across. If someone's position shows up on your gps, you can send them a text message via your radio.

You can also send out an emergency alert if needed.

What's your favorite SRT?
 

goodtimes

Expedition Poseur
#2
My favorite "SRT" is turning it on. Sometimes, if I feel froggy, I'll go as far as picking up the mic (actually, I have to pull it down....) and talk for a few seconds. Thats about it for me....

to be honest, if I had to go outside right now and set the radio up to use a repeater....I couldn't do it.
 

flyingwil

Supporting Sponsor - Sierra Expeditions
#3
:victory: That is freaking sweet... I need to learn about the 2m a bit more.

Could you do that in Mexico too?
 
#6
Chris and I have the same Garmin GPSMAP 276c unit that will plot the position of other APRS stations whose position information has been received by your station. It's not really useful on a day-to-day basis, but it is a fun toy when you're in the middle of nowhere, or wheelin' with friends with similar setups. Not all ham rigs will support this out of the box. In fact, the only two that support APRS from the factory are the Kenwood TM-V700A mobile and D7A handheld rigs. Others can be adapted to do it with more hardware, a laptop and other software, but it's pretty neat to plug my Garmin into the Kenwood and have APRS going in seconds. :victory:

I suppose it is also nice for seeing who out there could give you a hand if cell phone reception was down or other conditions prevent you from reaching help by other means. Most hams are, like Chris pointed out, obsessed with emergency preparedness and helping other hams, so it's reassuring when you're out in the boonies and see an APRS station waypoint pop up on the GPS screen.
 
#7
asteffes said:
Others can be adapted to do it with more hardware, a laptop and other software, but it's pretty neat to plug my Garmin into the Kenwood and have APRS going in seconds. :victory:
Very cool! I remember reading a post on this new technology a while ago. It certainly has its uses :)
 

k6uk

Adventurer
#8
More on APRS

APRS is also used a lot by disaster communications volunteers etc. It's a good way of keeping track of units.

Also - I haven't experimented with it, but there is HF APRS - which could be interesting for reporting positioning information when further out, or at sea etc.

-Mike
K6UK
 
#9
So I get back from my NV trip, and I am driving to the park to walk the dog and I notice that there is a APRS message on my radio.

The message is from the day before, when we were out on the Como trail. One of the messages(out of 3, all from a ham in Minden) says 'Boy, You are really out in the boonies!!'(that coming from a local)

Unfortunately, I didn't respond at the time because my mind was on other things(like getting unstuck!).

Back in January I was at Cal4wheel winterfest. While we were waiting for the jeeps to get unstuck, I was trading APRS messages with friends in the Bay area.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
#11
goodtimes said:
to be honest, if I had to go outside right now and set the radio up to use a repeater....I couldn't do it.
That's one great thing about radios made in the last several years...Auto Repeater! Spin the tuning dial to where repeater outputs should be, push the button and the radio will mostly likely have already figured out input offsets for you.
 
#13
DaveInDenver said:
That's one great thing about radios made in the last several years...Auto Repeater! Spin the tuning dial to where repeater outputs should be, push the button and the radio will mostly likely have already figured out input offsets for you.
On the way back from NV I was scanning stations and happened upon the El Dorado County ARES Net. I was able to do a tone scan to figure out what PL they were using. It was pretty cool not having to look it up.

The tone scan in addition to the auto offset make the repeater thing a lot easier.
 
Top