The Spend What it Takes Bikepacker

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
I have seen one... super light! But I'm not sure if it's sturdy enough to handle a pot of water .... a cup or two for sure but enough to make some pasta, i don't know.
 

Flagster

Expedition Leader
How are people keeping a GPS charged for multiple day/weeks...solar on backpack? heavy AA chargers???
Just wondering as I use a Garmin Edge 705...usually only get about 8 hours per charge
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
How are people keeping a GPS charged for multiple day/weeks...solar on backpack? heavy AA chargers???
Just wondering as I use a Garmin Edge 705...usually only get about 8 hours per charge
I've only used my 705 a couple times for bikepacking. Since we both have experience with the New Trent charger, I did experiement with my 705 and the New Trent iCarrier charged it twice. But, that's a heavy solution for uber light travel.

I have since switched to a Garmin eTrex 30. It pairs to an ANT+ heart rate strap, has good bike-centric features and hold's a useful charge for a couple days of riding and constant navigating. I've tried solar panels and that was such a waste of time.
 

Flagster

Expedition Leader
I've only used my 705 a couple times for bikepacking. Since we both have experience with the New Trent charger, I did experiement with my 705 and the New Trent iCarrier charged it twice. But, that's a heavy solution for uber light travel.

I have since switched to a Garmin eTrex 30. It pairs to an ANT+ heart rate strap, has good bike-centric features and hold's a useful charge for a couple days of riding and constant navigating. I've tried solar panels and that was such a waste of time.
Thanks!
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
Flagster, I think I'll migrate this topic to the front page with a feature on bikepacking navigation devices. Shoot me a PM if you have any ideas.
 

Camelfilter

Explorer
Older thread, but I'll add a couple things which had once worked extremely well for me:

If you will be camping near/or bellow zero:

A sleeping hood. I used the finbar sleep hood google, or see
http://www2.smumn.edu/deptpages/~finnovations/Hood/hood.html

This hood worked awesome for me, and on occasion was too warm! Sold it when i headed into warmer climate. I would get another.

A vapor barrier liner for your sleeping bag. These take some practice to get used to, I normally wore a thin wool layer as I didn't like the feeling without a layer. The one I used was just a simple silnylon sleeping bag liner (but was water proof) only weighed a few ounces & "almost" lasted a years tour. Integral Designs. I would get another.

Single wall freestanding tent. Single walls take some getting used too to vent properly, and definitely not the best choice for warm/humid conditions. Freestanding is great, can setup with ease-and in interesting spots too (cement pads, abandon buildings, ancient ruins etc). I used an Eureka Zeuse 2 Exo for 8 months-easy setup with just 2 poles, nice headroom when stuck inside, relatively light (?3.5 lbs) , packed really small. Room inside for all gear & the bike (on a couple occasions).

That tent held its value too-sold it in Nepal for about what I paid. I would get another.
 

Flagster

Expedition Leader
Another topic I would like to see addressed is footwear...

I don't bikepack a lot but some of the long day adventures I have been on in CO and central WA have required extensive hike a bike...especially on scree slopes...loose rock climbs...
My sidis take a beating on the toe caps and the traction is poor...replaceable soles help with wear but I am always slipping...
I know you always plan to spend more time in the pedals than out but what is your advice on shoes...
 

Two-Wheeled Explorer

Proceeding on...
Does anybody out there carry a gun when they're cyclo-touring? I've never seen big cats or bears when out camping/touring, but I know they're there. I'd like to have a defense to my game if I'm going to be on the "dinner plate." I've got a few handguns, but nothing light enough to consider carrying on a ride. Thoughts?
Nope. I see black bear all the time in the forests of MN and WI. Never a problem for me, although I did have a buddy biking with his dog where the dog and a male blackie had at it. Ron had to throw his bike at the bear to get it to back off.

A lot of people who ride the Great Divide MTB Route/Tour Divide Race carry bear spray either on their belt, hydration pack strap or handlebars. Even Alaska fat bike riders seem to carry spray instead of firearms. You have to be a really good shot with a really big (and heavy) gun to hit a charging bear from a bicycle.

That being said...
Ride safe!
Hans
 

Two-Wheeled Explorer

Proceeding on...
Another topic I would like to see addressed is footwear...

I don't bikepack a lot but some of the long day adventures I have been on in CO and central WA have required extensive hike a bike...especially on scree slopes...loose rock climbs...
My sidis take a beating on the toe caps and the traction is poor...replaceable soles help with wear but I am always slipping...
I know you always plan to spend more time in the pedals than out but what is your advice on shoes...
I usually use light-weight hiking boots on bike tours, with toe clips on my Bianchi Volpe and Power Grip straps on my MTB. Rigid enough for biking, flexible enough for hiking, durable enough for the long haul, plus they give me ankle support. I tuck the laces under the tongue while riding.

Ride safe,
Hans
 

SigNewt

New member
I am guessing a belt he does not carry, have you ever seen a broken belt? I haven't.... They are super stout.


Its a slick ride, makes me want to re-work my Gunnar RockHound in to a bikepacker!

Ok that makes more sense...

No doubt it is one sweet ride...belt drive too ???

I would think a chain would still be the go to for back country stuff...I would rather carry a few powerlinks than a spare belt...
 

jayspies

Adventurer
I'll resurrect this waaay cool thread with a not-needed-but-awesome-to-have addition: the Alite Monarch camp chair. I decided very early on that my butt didn't like to be sitting on hard ground, especially after a day of riding, and even more so if the ground is wet, rocky, or on an incline. The Monarch is small and light enough to be my one camp luxury. It has just 2 feet, and requires a bit of practice to find the sweet spot for balance, but that takes about 2 minutes. If you can ride a bike, you can use this chair. As it weighs 1.1 pounds and packs to the size of a shoe, it's perfect to get strapped to an anything cage or stuffed in a backpack. Recovery is everything, and being able to relax after the day is done helps tomorrow be awesome too. Just my .02.

Alite Monarch.jpg
 

Kiddmen57

Supporting Sponsor
I find one of the things that makes me nervous is heading out into the remote wilderness unsure how prepared I am agains foul weather. Especially in the mountains. There's always that moment before you head out when you're standing in your living room holding a jacket asking yourself, "take it, or not." Below are two pieces worth taking because they're so crazy light.

Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer $135 TWO OUNCES!!!
View attachment 88264
You read that right - two ounces. What's even more amazing is how small it is. I dared our sales rep to put it in his mouth - he said it was possible. It actually fit in his mouth. Not a great place to store it, but.... This is a water RESISTANT piece, so it won't fend off a proper storm, but it will add wind protection and additional warmth if layered over just a bike jersey and arm warmers. I use mine (very new, haven't used it much) if I'm stopped for a few minutes and want to evade a chilly breeze.
Christophe,
Anything you'd recommend for a light and ultra packable WATERPROOF jacket? Hopefully something close to $150 or so? I want it to keep in the pack just for wind and possible rain during changing conditions.
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
Christophe,
Anything you'd recommend for a light and ultra packable WATERPROOF jacket? Hopefully something close to $150 or so? I want it to keep in the pack just for wind and possible rain during changing conditions.
On the lighter side, I've been using this: The Berghaus VapourLight Hyper Smock 2. Dumbest name ever. :) It hits your price point to the penny.

http://expeditionportal.com/field-tested-berghaus-vapourlight-hyper-smock-2-0/

I've really put it to the test lately. I've come to the conclusion that it does work. It is ridiculously small. When the rain comes, it does benefit greatly from a good long sleeve base layer under it to help augment the breathability. If I wear it in a hard rain with a t-shirt and under exertion, I get a little condensation.

For the sake of full disclosure, they did provide it to me to test at no cost. I probably would not have braved the $150 without testing it first. However, having used it as much as I have this summer, I would absolutely have popped for the $150.

As an added disclaimer, if I really anticipate lots of rain, as I did in Iceland, nothing beats a good GoreTex jacket like my PacLite jacket from Arc'teryx, which is my foul weather go-to.
 
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