Towing a 16ft Airstream with a 4runner? Other alternatives?

bkg

Explorer
So it's safe to say then if living out of a vehicle setup that will be very close to or over max GVWR and GCWR that anything with the Toyota 4.7 V8 is a bad choice.
maybe/maybe not?

I've owned a bunch of 4.7's. Towed 6500# with them fairly regularly. I personally never had a problem with the manifolds. I also was fortunate to never have a problem with losing 4th gear in the trans, which was common in the 4-speeds. Shoot, I never even had rusty frame issues... IMHO, one of their more solid engines.

But that's just 5 4.7's out of millions, so it's definitely not a scientific poling.
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
maybe/maybe not?

I've owned a bunch of 4.7's. Towed 6500# with them fairly regularly. I personally never had a problem with the manifolds. I also was fortunate to never have a problem with losing 4th gear in the trans, which was common in the 4-speeds. Shoot, I never even had rusty frame issues... IMHO, one of their more solid engines.

But that's just 5 4.7's out of millions, so it's definitely not a scientific poling.
Driving style 100% plays a big factor. My 4.7 is still on its original equipment. However a few throttle jockey buddies have gone through them like full sized Snicker bars on Halloween.
High exhaust heat is what does them in, add that the 4.7 is easy to rev high rpms and you have perfect combo for throttle jockey types to cook exhaust bits on a regular basis
 

jmmaxus

Member
It sounds like Basecamp can be done with a 4runner (Tails of Wanderlust youtube).
She got rid of the 4Runner for a Tundra and now a Ram. Idk why maybe for a truck camper. I think the 4Runner could pull the smallest base camp 16 okay but idk if I’d pull the bigger one with it. I’ve seen a lot of people recommend only towing up to 80% if frequently and you’ll be around max tow/tongue with a 4Runner. Id recommend a Sequioa, Tundra, or any 1/2 ton truck.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

rruff

Explorer
Good to know, did some research you are correct. According to jalopnik, toyota did not adopt sae j2807 criteria until 2013.
According to this site, they were the first to adopt it. The domestics started in 2016, and their tow ratings dropped a lot. http://www.rv-project.com/resources/j2807.php

"SAE J2807 was initially published in 2008 (revised 2012), by the cooperation of the major truck manufacturers. However, initally only Toyota adopted the standard. It was rumored that GM would adopt the standard, but only if Ford did as well, and the circus began. Again, it seems that "one-up's-manship" between competitors was more important. In 2013, all of the truck manufacturers have promised adoption of the standard.

As of 2016, Ford, GM and RAM are publishing their tow ratings in compliance with J2807 (according to their 2016 towing guide brochures)."

Looks like the standard only deals with power (acceleration and climbing a grade) and axle load ratings. And oddly you can be slower if you have duallies... ?
 
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redthies

Renaissance Redneck
Buy the Bambi AS camper. The Basecamps have had problems and the resale value is crap compared to the Bambi.

A properly equipped 4runner will do just fine with a Bambi. The Bambi has trailer brakes and is well within the 5K towing of the 4runner. IF fuel mileage is a huge concern you need to find another way to live.

All this doom and gloom above over towing with a 4runner. No wonder the world is going to schidt. Everyone is a pessimist!
I own a company that builds out custom Airstreams. The 16’ Bambi is 100% the way to go over a Basecamp. They, as VR mentioned above, have more than double the resale, and are eminently more livable than the Basecamp. Nothing says fun like having to rearrange the furniture to cook dinner. You won’t have any problem towing a 16’ with a 4Runner, but a Tacoma might be more practical. You will wind up with a bunch of stuff to keep in the back that is better suited to a pickup with a topper than an SUV. I towed a 29’ Airstream to an inspection once with our ‘20 Tacoma when my fullsize was not working. It wasn’t fun, but it towed it ok. The Taco is rated for 6500 lbs, so you will have plenty of capacit.
 

nickw

Adventurer
I own a company that builds out custom Airstreams. The 16’ Bambi is 100% the way to go over a Basecamp. They, as VR mentioned above, have more than double the resale, and are eminently more livable than the Basecamp. Nothing says fun like having to rearrange the furniture to cook dinner. You won’t have any problem towing a 16’ with a 4Runner, but a Tacoma might be more practical. You will wind up with a bunch of stuff to keep in the back that is better suited to a pickup with a topper than an SUV. I towed a 29’ Airstream to an inspection once with our ‘20 Tacoma when my fullsize was not working. It wasn’t fun, but it towed it ok. The Taco is rated for 6500 lbs, so you will have plenty of capacit.
Tow capacity is still largely meaningless, or at least pointless in and of itself....GAWR or Payload are the two that generally limit towing capacity...
 

(none)

Adventurer
Tow capacity is still largely meaningless, or at least pointless in and of itself....GAWR or Payload are the two that generally limit towing capacity...
It's all relatively meaningless. The way numbers are assigned makes little sense. Why does a V8 Tundra have a 1300ish lb payload capacity, many new f150s are around the 1500lb mark but a 2022 Chevy traverse has around 1600lb payload capacity?
 

nickw

Adventurer
It's all relatively meaningless. The way numbers are assigned makes little sense. Why does a V8 Tundra have a 1300ish lb payload capacity, many new f150s are around the 1500lb mark but a 2022 Chevy traverse has around 1600lb payload capacity?
You just going to make up capacities, we need to rely on something. Different duty cycle is likely factored in. Maybe they are light and have minimal options?
 

(none)

Adventurer
You just going to make up capacities, we need to rely on something. Different duty cycle is likely factored in. Maybe they are light and have minimal options?
Who knows. That's what i'm saying. Who is actually within the limits of these magical numbers when hauling around their family and crap? I sure know i'm probably not. There is no mention that i know of stating reduced capacity for higher duty cycle.

Numbers are from a '21 Tundra extended cab, 4x4, SR5 with the big tank, '22 F150 crew cab, short bed 302a (both the 5.0 and 3.5tt were within 100ish lbs of eachother iirc), max tow package and a 2022 Traverse LT (work car, sitting in my driveway), 3rd row seat. The traverse is rated to tow 5k lbs too.

The Chevy is nice enough, but i'd much rather be pulling 5k lbs with the tundra or f150 with my family and crap loaded up and over weight than in the Traverse.
 

nickw

Adventurer
Who knows. That's what i'm saying. Who is actually within the limits of these magical numbers when hauling around their family and crap? I sure know i'm probably not. There is no mention that i know of stating reduced capacity for higher duty cycle.

Numbers are from a '21 Tundra extended cab, 4x4, SR5 with the big tank, '22 F150 crew cab, short bed 302a (both the 5.0 and 3.5tt were within 100ish lbs of eachother iirc), max tow package and a 2022 Traverse LT (work car, sitting in my driveway), 3rd row seat. The traverse is rated to tow 5k lbs too.

The Chevy is nice enough, but i'd much rather be pulling 5k lbs with the tundra or f150 with my family and crap loaded up and over weight than in the Traverse.
The Traverse #'s are per manual or per door sticker?

I'm in the numbers - I make sure of it....
 

rruff

Explorer
You just going to make up capacities, we need to rely on something.
Best to rely on what is between the ears. If the chassis has been out for awhile you can somewhat rely on the testimony of others regarding durability and driveability. When you are behind the wheel get a good feel for the vehicle's limitations... make sensible upgrades, and drive appropriately. An overloaded 1/2 ton even stock, will usually brake and handle better than a class A RV or big truck... or anything pulling a trailer. Make allowances for what you are in... which ain't a sports car or a trophy truck. Drive safe and under control.
 

(none)

Adventurer
The Traverse #'s are per manual or per door sticker?

I'm in the numbers - I make sure of it....
Stickers:




Best to rely on what is between the ears. If the chassis has been out for awhile you can somewhat rely on the testimony of others regarding durability and driveability. When you are behind the wheel get a good feel for the vehicle's limitations... make sensible upgrades, and drive appropriately. An overloaded 1/2 ton even stock, will usually brake and handle better than a class A RV or big truck... or anything pulling a trailer. Make allowances for what you are in... which ain't a sports car or a trophy truck. Drive safe and under control.
Totally agree
 

nickw

Adventurer
Best to rely on what is between the ears. If the chassis has been out for awhile you can somewhat rely on the testimony of others regarding durability and driveability. When you are behind the wheel get a good feel for the vehicle's limitations... make sensible upgrades, and drive appropriately. An overloaded 1/2 ton even stock, will usually brake and handle better than a class A RV or big truck... or anything pulling a trailer. Make allowances for what you are in... which ain't a sports car or a trophy truck. Drive safe and under control.
The problem with that is you are relying on somebody else to make the same smart "grey area" decisions you are because they heard it on the internet.

You perspective comes across a bit "It's ok for me to do it because I know", sure, it just means you need to respect others to push the limits of their rigs without reservation....they all have their reasons and they all believe it's ok too and of course....they are all "safe" drivers and are well under control.

I think a lot of the chatter here is justifying a decisions....at least that's how it reads to me.

Disagree with the class A RV comment...they are designed to handle the loads, while braking distance may be considerable...they are not going to overheat like a small vehicle will. Same goes for handling and load carrying, they are designed for it....nevermind duty cycles and longevity.
 

Mickey Bitsko

Adventurer
Op, rent a trailer and tow it with your runner, if it doesn't bother you, get the tt you want. This isn't rocket science (judging by the comments)
 

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