Towing a 16ft Airstream with a 4runner? Other alternatives?

nickw

Adventurer
Op, rent a trailer and tow it with your runner, if it doesn't bother you, get the tt you want. This isn't rocket science (judging by the comments)
Unless he's bought one he doesn't have one, that was the question.....should he buy one to travel with full time...
 

Mickey Bitsko

Adventurer
Unless he's bought one he doesn't have one, that was the question.....should he buy one to travel with full time...
I'm suggesting he rent to get a feel of the capability of the 4runner, if he spends his money on a larger vehicle, all this hand wringing is moot.
 

(none)

Adventurer
Well, it has a higher GVWR than a Tacoma and is right up there with a 4runner....whats not to understand?
Huh? Understanding the posts its referring to first...
GVWR is part of the figure, but the bigger comment is the available payload capacity that GVWR allows for, which is substantially more than a Tacoma, 4Runner or Tundra.
 

nickw

Adventurer
Huh? Understanding the posts its referring to first...
GVWR is part of the figure, but the bigger comment is the available payload capacity that GVWR allows for, which is substantially more than a Tacoma, 4Runner or Tundra.
It has a higher GVWR than a Tacoma, but its in line with the likes of a 4runner and other SUV's.

Are you asking why they designed it like that? Who knows.
 

01tundra

Explorer
No, it is occupants plus luggage. That number is never referred to as payload anywhere on my door or owners manual.

View attachment 749559

Then read the tongue weight calculation. It only references Gross vehicle weight

View attachment 749560
You're taking numbers out of the "manual" to determine available payload, yet claiming everyone else doesn't know what they are talking about? And everything you've added, including any suspension upgrades goes against the available payload.

The only numbers you need to worry about are GVWR, GCWR, GAWR.

It's real simple, go to a local CAT scale and weight your vehicle while loaded just like you normally travel, including occupants, gear and a full tank of fuel. Subtract that number (actual curb weight) from the GVWR listed on your vehicle's door post data plate, that's how much available payload you have to work with. It's simple math: Payload = GVWR - Curb Weight. Doesn't matter what any manual, website or other data says.

Any there's very few travel trailers that have a loaded tongue weight of 10%, every one I've owned have ran in the 12.5-14% range and that's lightly packed and measured with a Sherline tongue weight scale.
 

Todd n Natalie

OverCamper
Who knows. That's what i'm saying. Who is actually within the limits of these magical numbers when hauling around their family and crap? I sure know i'm probably not. There is no mention that i know of stating reduced capacity for higher duty cycle.

Numbers are from a '21 Tundra extended cab, 4x4, SR5 with the big tank, '22 F150 crew cab, short bed 302a (both the 5.0 and 3.5tt were within 100ish lbs of eachother iirc), max tow package and a 2022 Traverse LT (work car, sitting in my driveway), 3rd row seat. The traverse is rated to tow 5k lbs too.

The Chevy is nice enough, but i'd much rather be pulling 5k lbs with the tundra or f150 with my family and crap loaded up and over weight than in the Traverse.
I can see it being possible. F150 has an aluminum body. Tundra is steel? Maybe that plays a role?
For reference my 302a F150 3.5 has a payload of 1,777lbs.
Maybe things like frame thickness (looking at you HDPP) spring packs, etc also play a role.

To speak on the Traverse... I believe they like a 4Runner can be 7 seaters?
Throw 7 people in there and their luggage and you probably need to have a payload rating somewhere in that vicinity.

And I agree. Even if the Traverse is rated to tow 5,000 lbs. I wouldn't want to do it. Ask me how I know....


13575775_10209173573163986_1911230519143758850_o.jpg
 
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Mickey Bitsko

Adventurer
Do payload/ cargo ratings stay with the life of a vehicle?
For instance, a 2xxx year 3/4 ton with 250k on the clock and hauled max
Loads etc for those miles would be the same as when new?
 

nickw

Adventurer
Do payload/ cargo ratings stay with the life of a vehicle?
For instance, a 2xxx year 3/4 ton with 250k on the clock and hauled max
Loads etc for those miles would be the same as when new?
Yeah - same as new, I am sure there are some maintenance stds. related to spring degradation and sagging....
 

jaxyaks

Adventurer
I own a company that builds out custom Airstreams. The 16’ Bambi is 100% the way to go over a Basecamp. They, as VR mentioned above, have more than double the resale, and are eminently more livable than the Basecamp. Nothing says fun like having to rearrange the furniture to cook dinner.
The Base camp 20x solves that problem and gives you pretty much a king size bed, I am a huge fan of the 20x interior layout.
 

jaxyaks

Adventurer
OP, buy a 4 runner hook up to a basecamp 20 or 16 or a Bambi and go out and enjoy yourself, come back here after you get back from your trip and catch up on all the back and forth why you can't/ or shouldn't do it...
 
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nickw

Adventurer
OP, buy a 4 runner hook up to a basecamp 20 or 16 or a Bambi and go out and enjoy yourself, come back here after you get back from your trip and catch up on all the back and forth why you can't do it...
Big difference between "cant" and "shouldn't"....there is no question, towing full time like he wants to do, there are absolutely better rigs out there than a 4runner....
 
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