Toymaster's M416 style trailer evolution

toymaster

Explorer
In 2011 the bug bit me for a light weight off road trailer to supplement my JK. Full disclosure I have a trailer fetish. According to the Cambridge dictionary a fetish is "an activity or object that you are so interested in that you spend an unreasonable amount of time thinking about it or doing it" http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fetish If that does not describe me and my trailers I don't know what does. I have a half dozen of various types of trailers but this thread is only about my little adventure trailer.
:camping:

The trailer was made by a now defunct "business" in Nevada that shall remain nameless. The brand awning I have is no longer available in the USA and the RTT is a model that no longer is available. It could be said to be bordering on unobtainium or a moral of strike while the iron is hot.

Even though I'm a fabricator, when bitten I was working over seas and my time in the USA was more valuable than the cost of having a trailer built. Given this I ordered a functional trailer with only the options that made sense to be added while being built with full intention of adding equipment to it in due time.

When new...


and now...








 
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JOSX2

Observer
dang dude...that's nice! reeeeaalllyyyy digging the yellow too ;)

my trailer fetish has just started! my ultimate end-goal...something like yours with an elevated RTT color-matched to my X.
 

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toymaster

Explorer
To anyone building a trailer similar to this I suggest to put a wheel on the jack instead of a foot. Moving a 1,500lb trailer is hard enough and you need every help you can get when trying to hook the trailer back up to the tow vic in the woods. I promise you will not have any issues with stability versus using a foot, I went through the same thought process but empirical evidence and some aggravation taught me to use a wheel.



Keep the chains and wires as short as possible while having enough for full articulation. Also, have a jack that can be removed to get it out of the way.



Also, keep the blade connector up out of harm's way. I cut a hole in the bumper so the connector is protected from those mean nasty rocks that jump out of the ground at you.

 
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toymaster

Explorer
dang dude...that's nice! reeeeaalllyyyy digging the yellow too ;) .....
In 2006 I bought a 50th anniversary Yamaha R1 and it started me getting all my toys in yellow.



Ignore the date in the pic, I didn't have the date set on the camera....





I was working in Kenya for most of 2006 and fell in love with the bike because of this image; it was my desktop computer background. When I got home I went straight to the dealer and got one.

 
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toymaster

Explorer
A National Luna 80L fridge/freezer is on a mounting plate inside the tub. It takes up ~25% of interior but to me refrigerated real estate is better than non, you can always store food items in it that does not necessarily need to be refrigerated if room is a concern.







In the tongue box I mounted a 2,500 watt inverter to supply 120V. Not 100% sure why, just seemed to be the thing to do.



 
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toymaster

Explorer
FUEL got to have fuel. The jeep has a 18 gallon tank and gets not great mileage. I have two 2 gallon rotopax on the rear of the trailer, two 5 gallon scepter can on the tongue, and one 4 gallon rotopax on the jeep. This let me carry an additional 18 gallon thereby doubling my range.






 

toymaster

Explorer
I've been wanting a rear swing out carrier for years. I used a smittybilt TJ tire carrier and modified it to fit. Had to narrow the width, mount the hinge lower, and fabricate the attachment points to the trailer frame. The pros are it was inexpensive, light weight, and a versatile design that allows multiple pieces to be mounted easily. The cons are that it is light weight, cheap, designed to be mass production friendly instead of the 'best way', and the quality is not what I would have put on my jeep. I knew this beforehand but the time and money savings won out in the end.

Most, if not all, of the time the kitchen box will live there but if the journey dictates another spare tire can easily be mounted there.











Last little while I've been thinking to add some armor on the lower portion of the carrier to protect the pelican case or spare tire for that matter. I can see dropping off a rock ledge and the plastic case being ripped off. It may be years before I actually fab one (back to the fetish thing...)
 
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toymaster

Explorer
A roof rack was used to mount the RTT. At the time the brand Rhino-rack was the best value/quality mixture. A rack was used for versatility but so far only the RTT has lived there. I have an idea haul my 14' raft on there some day, of course I"ll have to add another support on back... and possibly the tongue.



 

toymaster

Explorer
^^^^ It is a Pelican 1650. Maybe not the perfect size but I already had the case from back when the airline luggage weight limit was 100lbs. Since 2006 it was just sitting in my garage.
 

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