Tundra vs F150

deserteagle56

Adventurer
When I was truck shopping in 2015 I tried out a lot of different trucks and finally narrowed it down to either Toyota or Ford. The Toyota mainly because of its reputation for dependability. But I went with the F150 because it just "fit" me better. I detest having a big console on my right, forcing me to sit in a tunnel which all Toyotas - Tundra or Tacoma - have. I want the gearshift up on the steering column, out of the way. Plus, I prefer to sit upright and up high - just as I would sit in a kitchen chair. That's the way my F150 allows me to sit. The Toyotas made me feel as though I was sitting on the floor with my feet out in front of me.

I was all convinced I needed the 5.0. The company I worked for had a lot of F150s - and talking with the guys who drove them, and more importantly, the mechanics who worked on them - they convinced me to go with the 3.5 Ecoboost. "Like driving a diesel with its low-end torque but without the diesel emissions crap" is about the best way to summarize the opinions. So I spec'd out just the truck I wanted, placed an order with the local dealer, and picked up my new truck in May of 2016.

So I've had the truck just shy of 3 years now - and just about to turn 32,000 miles. It has been flawless - never been back to the dealer for any reason. Routine maintenance only, that I do myself. The guys were right about the low end torque - the way this thing will go up over an 11,000 foot elevation mountain pass without needing to shift down is amazing. Of course, at high elevation is where the turbos, packing in all that air, really shine. Someone up above complained about turbo lag - I have to say I never experienced it with the Ecoboost. And don't let anyone try to tell you that turbos compromise dependability...I've owned several turbodiesel pickups (my current heavy hauler is a Dodge/Cummins dually) and the one thing I NEVER had problems with was the turbo. I spec'd the truck with the 36 gallon gas tank and that's a real benefit because of where I live (lots of wide open spaces and few places to fuel). I enter my fuel into an Excel spreadsheet so I can tell you with absolute accuracy that since new this truck has averaged 20.9 mpg (the lie-o-meter in the dash is always reading up to 2 mpg optimistic); most of the time I put around 600 miles on the odometer in between fuelings. The truck also has the rear locker which I've found pretty darn handy when crossing washouts where one front and one rear tire are pretty much hanging in the air!

To sum up - if today I wrecked this truck, tomorrow I'd order another one just like it.
The truck in use...this time of year some of our roads are also stream beds due to snowmelt:
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The Yamaha Kodiak fits in the bed (6.5') with the tailgate shut, big plus for me:
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Over 300 miles on the odometer since the last fillup - and the gauge is still above half a tank!
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Wallygator

Adventurer
Tundra is old school, F150 is modern

Here are this years photos from the offset collision testing.

2019 F150
View attachment 509649

2019 TUNDRA
View attachment 509650
I know these show some things but I also believe some manufacturers total goal is to do well in these lab tests and design the vehicles around these lab tests in order to be able to advertise the success. Which is smart business on their part but..... These are lab tests and nothing in real life happens like it does in a lab. So I note the lab test result but it does not determine which vehicle I buy. YMMV.
 

rruff

Explorer
When I was truck shopping in 2015 I tried out a lot of different trucks and finally narrowed it down to either Toyota or Ford. The Toyota mainly because of its reputation for dependability. But I went with the F150 because it just "fit" me better. I detest having a big console on my right, forcing me to sit in a tunnel which all Toyotas - Tundra or Tacoma - have. I want the gearshift up on the steering column, out of the way. Plus, I prefer to sit upright and up high - just as I would sit in a kitchen chair. That's the way my F150 allows me to sit. The Toyotas made me feel as though I was sitting on the floor with my feet out in front of me.
Did you actually look at a Tundra? My shifter is on the column, no center console, and seating is very upright.
 

Ducky's Dad

Explorer
Did you actually look at a Tundra? My shifter is on the column, no center console

Probably depends on which version you look at. My CrewMax is an SR5 with front buckets, center console, and shifter in the console. The console is nice, but the shift gate is poorly designed.
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
I know these show some things but I also believe some manufacturers total goal is to do well in these lab tests and design the vehicles around these lab tests in order to be able to advertise the success. Which is smart business on their part but..... These are lab tests and nothing in real life happens like it does in a lab. So I note the lab test result but it does not determine which vehicle I buy. YMMV.

Fair enough. But for the rest of us that scalp rock buggy parts from a junk yard,we see plenty of those wrecks. Heck, we flock towards the fresh kills. Great way to get fresh SD axles.

We can argue a lot of things, but I'd rather crash a Ford than a Toyota. When I was stuck in a GM Express van, I had to make peace with the fact that any serious crash would cost me my legs. It's a shame that companies still buy those s#$% boxes. So much happier in a big truck.
 
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deserteagle56

Adventurer
Did you actually look at a Tundra? My shifter is on the column, no center console, and seating is very upright.
I checked out several. All had the center console and the salesman told me that's the way they all came.

I've had a couple Toyota cars and was impressed with the dependability. Also the durability - I travel a lot of remote country and generally when I meet someone way back in the rough stuff they are either in a Jeep or a Toyota. But I couldn't find one I was comfortable in.

Anyway, so far I'm really happy with my choice.
 

rruff

Explorer
I suspect the SR is the only one without a console, but surely most of the F150s have a center console as well? And the Tundra has upright seating; it's nothing like a Tacoma.
 
I suspect the SR is the only one without a console, but surely most of the F150s have a center console as well? And the Tundra has upright seating; it's nothing like a Tacoma.
I'd guess it's like a 50/50 split. You can also get the console and still have a column shift on certain F150's depending on how you option them out.
 

rrflyer

New member
The problem with the F150s and the front bench is that there are no AC vents in the rear seats. I live in Texas and travel around the southwest. With three kids and a dog in the back with no AC vents is gonna be a big nogo


The center console on both trucks is annoying but is a way to route some air con back there.
 

billiebob

Active member
I know these show some things but I also believe some manufacturers total goal is to do well in these lab tests and design the vehicles around these lab tests in order to be able to advertise the success. Which is smart business on their part but..... These are lab tests and nothing in real life happens like it does in a lab. So I note the lab test result but it does not determine which vehicle I buy. YMMV.
very true. the manufacturers DEFINITELY build to pass the test. Which is why the test exists. BUT you tell me you would chose broken knees for your son over open the door and step out? The tests are equal for every manufacturer. Sorry, but I buy according to how safe my family travels.

Hesrs a good read..

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Wallygator

Adventurer
very true. the manufacturers DEFINITELY build to pass the test. Which is why the test exists. BUT you tell me you would chose broken knees for your son over open the door and step out? The tests are equal for every manufacturer. Sorry, but I buy according to how safe my family travels.

Hesrs a good read..

View attachment 509777
I guess so.....I own a 5th gen 4Runner. It didn't do so well in the lab.

Hate to keep showing this video but the point is real life is not a lab. The Wrangler didn't fare well in the lab. This person recovered and lived. I will take body on frame over anything.

Not a lab offset test in a BOF vehicle.

 

JTM

New member
I’m looking at upgrading from a 4Runner to fit 3 car seats in soon...... looking at Tubdra and F150s both crew cabs both V8s.

Wanting a decent do all truck for family but also do some back roads/fire roads. Big bend, Colorado, nm etc.....

Any opinions on one vs other?
My search was a little different, a changing in jobs meant I needed a greater towing capacity than a Tacoma could offer. We ended up buying a left over 2018 F150 XLT/FX4, to me it was more comfortable than the Tundra and it came with more stuff like, usb chargers everywhere and an E-Locker. I haven't owned it long enough to saying anything about quality or longevity, but I can say it is comfortable, quiet, and it has plenty of power.

Initially I was looking at XL/STX models because of the price point, but found a lot of leftover 2018 XLTs around the same price.

Hope you found your truck already.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
I think it may be a little more substantial than that. Looks like a new platform:
https://www.autoblog.com/2019/04/08/toyota-tacoma-tundra-trucks-shared-platform/
I'm not sure what to think about this, I work in Automotive Development / Testing and platform sharing is mostly for cost reduction. Not that wouldn't like cheaper trucks but I'm someone who is also paying for quality, purpose, and engineering.
Yeah.... I'm sure it's for cost reduction. But I am pretty sure that the cost savings won't be passed on to the consumer....

I think people are misinterpreting that story.

When OEM's say they're using a "shared platform" that doesn't necessarily mean they're going to use the exact same chassis for each vehicle...I see that as an indication that Toyota is looking to further streamline the type and measurements used for certain components and hardware.

Yes, to some degree it is about cost-cutting...but keep in mind all of the OEM's have been trending toward that sort of production planning for quite some time now. Toyota isn't the first company to do this.

Edit: Also, any gouge which doesn't come straight from a Toyota PR rep's mouth should be taken with a pound of salt....for whatever reason, the car gossip is at its worse with regards to Toyota...everyone knows someone who has a cousin that works at a dealership...so everyone has the inside scoop.

99% of the rumors that have come out about Toyota have turned out to be BS in the long run.
 
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