Waxy contaminant in propane line

Scoutman

Explorer
Over the past few weeks I have been tearing down the stove and cleaning all fittings, lines, and burners. I used a torch to 'melt' out the grease and q-tips to get those hard to reach areas. I pulled the Jets and made a tool to get the valves apart. At least now I know how to do all this in the field.

This evening I got it all back together and connected the stove to a 1# green cylinder via an adapter. I ran both burners for ~15 min or so and then pulled the hose fitting with no residue to be found. We're heading to the woods for the weekend so we will see how it does. As of now I'm going to say that the tank is contaminated.









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john61ct

Adventurer
Swap out flex hoses regularly, if in daily use even yearly.

Also either swap tanks or get yours cleaned out regularly, maybe $20.

Yes that Nash filter helps.
 

Scoutman

Explorer
Well after this weekend I guess I'm back to suspecting the hose. I left the 10# tank at home and used one disposable green cylinder the whole Labor Day weekend. It ran ok but I noticed it would start off strong and then ran at probably 80% throttle. I figured it was just the flow rate of the smaller bottles and never sputtered or acted funny otherwise. Anyway, when I was packing up yesterday and disconnected the hose from the stove I was greeted with another blob at the fitting.



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dreadlocks

Well-known member
is it possible you didnt get it all out the first cleaning?

Was there ever any of this residue on the hose inlet when you cleaned everything up? or have you only ever found it at the outlet where the stove is at? If only at the stove then its definitely the hose.

either way tho, I'd be replacing the hose.. since you aint heating it up w/a torch and getting it clean like you did the stove parts.
 

Scoutman

Explorer
is it possible you didnt get it all out the first cleaning?

Was there ever any of this residue on the hose inlet when you cleaned everything up? or have you only ever found it at the outlet where the stove is at? If only at the stove then its definitely the hose.

either way tho, I'd be replacing the hose.. since you aint heating it up w/a torch and getting it clean like you did the stove parts.
It is possible I didn't get it all when I cleaned everything. To clean the hose I disconnected it from the regulator and removed the schrader valve then blew it out really good with compressed air. The line blew clean and I don't recall any stuff coming from the hose. I wasn't comfortable putting any cleaning agents (like brake cleaner, acetone, alcohol, etc.) down the hose as I wasn't sure how they would attack the rubber.

I don't remember ever seeing anything on the inlet of the hose or on either side of the regulator. It's all been further down stream which I figured was due to the orifices and smaller restrictions catching the stuff (like the schrader valve and jets on the burners).

I'll likely end up replacing the hose but I will sleep better knowing what the real problem is before I do. I'm trying the 'free' options first. If everything points to the hose then I'll likely split it lengthwise with a razor blade and inspect what's inside. I also want to run my 10# tank on the skottle to see if that poses any problems. I have other means of cooking so it's not a show stopper for us.

It would be nice to get that special partner fitting mated directly to a 1/4 npt fitting so you can use whatever hose you want. If this is something that needs to be replaced every few years then I won't have to go back to partner every time.

Curious to know if anyone else has had this issue. I can't be the only one out there. :unsure:
 

perterra

Adventurer
It is possible I didn't get it all when I cleaned everything. To clean the hose I disconnected it from the regulator and removed the schrader valve then blew it out really good with compressed air. The line blew clean and I don't recall any stuff coming from the hose. I wasn't comfortable putting any cleaning agents (like brake cleaner, acetone, alcohol, etc.) down the hose as I wasn't sure how they would attack the rubber.

I don't remember ever seeing anything on the inlet of the hose or on either side of the regulator. It's all been further down stream which I figured was due to the orifices and smaller restrictions catching the stuff (like the schrader valve and jets on the burners).

I'll likely end up replacing the hose but I will sleep better knowing what the real problem is before I do. I'm trying the 'free' options first. If everything points to the hose then I'll likely split it lengthwise with a razor blade and inspect what's inside. I also want to run my 10# tank on the skottle to see if that poses any problems. I have other means of cooking so it's not a show stopper for us.

It would be nice to get that special partner fitting mated directly to a 1/4 npt fitting so you can use whatever hose you want. If this is something that needs to be replaced every few years then I won't have to go back to partner every time.

Curious to know if anyone else has had this issue. I can't be the only one out there. :unsure:
I have seen similar in scrap torch regulators before, and always on the propane side, never on the oxygen side. We sell T grade hose so there should be no effect from the hoses
 

perterra

Adventurer
What is a T grade hose?
It's a grade of twin line cutting torch hose designed for use with alternate fuels other than acetylene. I've never seen it in anything other than a twin oxygen/acetylene hose designed for cutting torches. Really more to do with stopping the hose from dry rotting. Propane has a lot of oils in it as a bi product, mixed with a little water in the cylinder and you get what you are seeing. I think your problem is compounded by the small cylinder size. In this case I would guess you are picking up left over residual contaminants from the hose.
 

Pntyrmvr

Adventurer
It’s the hose breaking down. I’ve seen posts showing similar clogging on built in propane systems.


"Talk is cheap. Whiskey costs money."
 

RedF

Adventurer
I'd bet on a combination of water and "heavy ends" having contaminated your propane cylinder; it happens. Clean all the gunk out of your stove, regulator and hose. Clean the hose with solvent and blow it out with compressed air, then try a new propane source. You can clean the tank yourself too, but you might be better off having a shop do it for you. Propane isn't that scary, but it's no joke either.
 

Scoutman

Explorer
Sounds familiar @Verkstad
Interesting that you have copper so the hose theory certainly wouldn't work for your application.

I haven't dug back into mine yet but will do so in the next week or so.
 

dreadlocks

Well-known member
I put a filter on the high pressure side of my regulator because I had encountered stories of poor quality LP gunking up even hardlines.. figured with how much money I spent on furnace and stove, the filter was cheap insurance.
 
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