What do you think about this non-street legal India “Jeep”?

WVI

Adventurer
I like them...not that I have a use for it.
I live in the country and a neighbor bought one...they ride it around the roads out here like folks do ATV/s and golf carts.
I think for the cost, you could buy a used licensable 4x4.
 
I like the new grill, and I've really considered getting one. I have the real thing though ( a 1957 cj5), so I have no use for a Roxor. That drivetrain is pretty tempting though! I'm definitely planning on adding Roxor parts to modernize my Jeep, such as the swinging pedals, maybe steering parts and linkages.

Im glad they're in the market, and I think they have a place. Farmers and ranchers were swearing by jeeps in the willys era for all sorts of chores; those are the roles that this machine will fill. It's a completely different demographic than the wrangler crowd.
 

JaSAn

Active member
Questions:

How much latitude does a state have in licensing a vehicle for highway use that does not me federal emissions or safety standards?

Can such a vehicle be driven across state lines legally?
 

Tokarev

Member
Questions:

How much latitude does a state have in licensing a vehicle for highway use that does not me federal emissions or safety standards?

Can such a vehicle be driven across state lines legally?
States vary. Check with your DMV.

Same answer to your second question but in this case I'd say check with DMV in neighboring states.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

AbleGuy

[Back] Roads Scholar
Don’t be giving up yet if you’re interested in this rig. The Mahindra Roxor is turning out to be something like a hard to kill zombie. Or to paraphrase what Aaarnold once said, ”It’ll be back (soon).”

”Mahindra already has an updated 2020 model planned with an all-new front end design. According to AutocarIndia,Mahindra is planning to roll out the new model soon, likely hoping that it will solve its problems with [the Jeep infringement lawsuit]. The updated model is also said to include a more aggressive rear end ratio to help get more power to the ground.”

from: https://www.tfloffroad.com/2019/11/jeep-closer-to-stopping-us-roxor-sales-redesigned-model-coming/

Mahindra is a big company, the world’s largest manufacturer of tractors and size wise is becoming a serious entrant in the ORV market.
 
Last edited:

Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
Questions:

How much latitude does a state have in licensing a vehicle for highway use that does not me federal emissions or safety standards?

Can such a vehicle be driven across state lines legally?
That's kind of an apples-to-oranges comparison.

The Federal government has the authority to regulate IMPORTS and to require that vehicles that are imported for HIGHWAY use meet certain standards for emissions, safety, etc.

But once they're in the US, the Federal government doesn't regulate them as that is a state matter. Some states (like CA) have very strict emissions requirements that all but prohibit certain vehicles from being sold or registered there and other states have little or no emissions requirements.

States also have broad authority to regulate motorcycles and UTVs and to decide whether or under what circumstances they can be licensed for road use. In Colorado, for example, you CANNOT license a 4 wheeled vehicle for road use if it was not originally designed for road use (IOW you cannot put a license plate on a 4 wheeled ATV or UTV no matter what.) Now, there are counties in CO where ATVs/UTVs are permitted to drive on COUNTY roads, but in this case it's not so much that they're "legal" to use on the street (they're not), but rather that they are "tolerated" (or to put it differently, the county has made it a policy not to enforce the law and to look the other way.)

In other states, you CAN get a license plate on a UTV or ATV, it's almost always a "Motorcycle" license plate and sometimes there are restrictions on where you can use it (often having to do with speed limits - such as "cannot use on any road where the speed limit is greater than 50mph.")

As far as driving THOSE vehicles across state lines - yes, it CAN be legal as long as the vehicle is operated in a legal manner in BOTH states. So, for example, if South Dakota allows a Roxor to be plated as a UTV and Wyoming does as well, then you could drive a South Dakota registered ROXOR into Wyoming and vice-versa.

But you COULD NOT drive it into Colorado, even though it has a Wyoming or South Dakota plate because 4 wheeled ATVs are not street legal in CO, no matter where they are registered.

Roxor, IMO, is trying to game the system by bringing in what is, to any observer, a 4 wheeled automobile and classifying it as a UTV so as to avoid the requirements that imported automobiles have for safety, rollover protection, air bags, emissions, lighting, etc.

At this point Mahindra is basically daring the Federal government to tighten up the rules as to what can be classified as a "UTV" for purposes of importation (I don't think there are any right now.) After all, if the Mahindra is successful, what is to prevent someone from importing, say, a 70-series LC to the US and classifying it as a "UTV?" Or maybe one of those Russian 4 wheel drive vehicles that do not otherwise meet safety and emissions standards?

You could even take it to ridiculous extremes and try to import an 8x8 KAMAZ tractor as a "UTV."

But the REAL legal danger, IMO, does not come from the Feds, it comes from lawsuit-happy attorneys, the plantiff's bar. If someone gets injured because a Roxor was illegally being used on a highway - particularly if it can be claimed that the injury is due to lack of airbags, ABS, rollover protection or other things that a road-legal vehicle would have - then the lawyers will argue that Roxor is trying to exploit a "loophole" in the law to illegally import vehicles that don't meet safety standards with the knowledge that (despite their disclaimers otherwise) they will be used as highway vehicles. That puts Mahindra into a very tough spot legally and it won't take long before Manhinra's own lawyers tell them to stop exporting them to the US.

To see a great example of how this actually happened, look at how quickly the 3-wheeled ATVs disappeared in the mid 1980s. It only took a few lawsuits and all of a sudden the manufacturers realized that "death trikes" were not a good thing to be selling in the US.
 

shade

Well-known member
Roxor, IMO, is trying to game the system by bringing in what is, to any observer, a 4 wheeled automobile and classifying it as a UTV so as to avoid the requirements that imported automobiles have for safety, rollover protection, air bags, emissions, lighting, etc.
yep
 

Tokarev

Member
Roxor, IMO, is trying to game the system by bringing in what is, to any observer, a 4 wheeled automobile and classifying it as a UTV so as to avoid the requirements that imported automobiles have for safety, rollover protection, air bags, emissions, lighting, etc.

Or has Mahindra identified a business opportunity and seized upon it?




Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

TripLeader

Explorer
I appreciate the quality legal views you have shared in this thread. I've learned some things.

🧠

That's kind of an apples-to-oranges comparison.

The Federal government has the authority to regulate IMPORTS and to require that vehicles that are imported for HIGHWAY use meet certain standards for emissions, safety, etc.

But once they're in the US, the Federal government doesn't regulate them as that is a state matter. Some states (like CA) have very strict emissions requirements that all but prohibit certain vehicles from being sold or registered there and other states have little or no emissions requirements.

States also have broad authority to regulate motorcycles and UTVs and to decide whether or under what circumstances they can be licensed for road use. In Colorado, for example, you CANNOT license a 4 wheeled vehicle for road use if it was not originally designed for road use (IOW you cannot put a license plate on a 4 wheeled ATV or UTV no matter what.) Now, there are counties in CO where ATVs/UTVs are permitted to drive on COUNTY roads, but in this case it's not so much that they're "legal" to use on the street (they're not), but rather that they are "tolerated" (or to put it differently, the county has made it a policy not to enforce the law and to look the other way.)

In other states, you CAN get a license plate on a UTV or ATV, it's almost always a "Motorcycle" license plate and sometimes there are restrictions on where you can use it (often having to do with speed limits - such as "cannot use on any road where the speed limit is greater than 50mph.")

As far as driving THOSE vehicles across state lines - yes, it CAN be legal as long as the vehicle is operated in a legal manner in BOTH states. So, for example, if South Dakota allows a Roxor to be plated as a UTV and Wyoming does as well, then you could drive a South Dakota registered ROXOR into Wyoming and vice-versa.

But you COULD NOT drive it into Colorado, even though it has a Wyoming or South Dakota plate because 4 wheeled ATVs are not street legal in CO, no matter where they are registered.

Roxor, IMO, is trying to game the system by bringing in what is, to any observer, a 4 wheeled automobile and classifying it as a UTV so as to avoid the requirements that imported automobiles have for safety, rollover protection, air bags, emissions, lighting, etc.

At this point Mahindra is basically daring the Federal government to tighten up the rules as to what can be classified as a "UTV" for purposes of importation (I don't think there are any right now.) After all, if the Mahindra is successful, what is to prevent someone from importing, say, a 70-series LC to the US and classifying it as a "UTV?" Or maybe one of those Russian 4 wheel drive vehicles that do not otherwise meet safety and emissions standards?

You could even take it to ridiculous extremes and try to import an 8x8 KAMAZ tractor as a "UTV."

But the REAL legal danger, IMO, does not come from the Feds, it comes from lawsuit-happy attorneys, the plantiff's bar. If someone gets injured because a Roxor was illegally being used on a highway - particularly if it can be claimed that the injury is due to lack of airbags, ABS, rollover protection or other things that a road-legal vehicle would have - then the lawyers will argue that Roxor is trying to exploit a "loophole" in the law to illegally import vehicles that don't meet safety standards with the knowledge that (despite their disclaimers otherwise) they will be used as highway vehicles. That puts Mahindra into a very tough spot legally and it won't take long before Manhinra's own lawyers tell them to stop exporting them to the US.

To see a great example of how this actually happened, look at how quickly the 3-wheeled ATVs disappeared in the mid 1980s. It only took a few lawsuits and all of a sudden the manufacturers realized that "death trikes" were not a good thing to be selling in the US.
 

shade

Well-known member
Or has Mahindra identified a business opportunity and seized upon it?
They're playing the grey, no doubt about it.

Maybe that'll work in the short term, but many attempts to skirt road-legal use issues end badly for owners in some way. I'd buy one with the understanding that it could always be used off-road, but that any road-legal use classification would be a bonus that could disappear.
 
Last edited:

Tokarev

Member
They're playing the grey, no doubt about it.

Maybe that'll work in the short term, but many attempts to skirt legal road legal issues end badly for owners in some way. I'd buy one with the understanding that it could always be used off-road, but that any legal road use classification would be a bonus that could disappear.
How is it any different than something like the Polaris Slingshot? That is neither car nor motorcycle and doesn't really fit the definition of either.

People keep referencing some type of "illegal" activity with these. If I abide by state licensing requirements and have the vehicle properly insured I don't see where the illegal comes in. No difference between the Roxor and many other vehicles in this regard. Again, state law vary but if I plate and insure it for street use in AZ, UT etc what's the illegal part?

Also these are no more or less safe than a 1970s or 80s CJ. Maybe even possibly more safe than some older rigs because the Rox has vacuum assisted front brakes.

Finally, if someone wrecks one of these and sues MANA how does that impact me in any way shape or form? Will a successful lawsuit somehow mean I have to turn the vehicle in for destruction?

For a place called "Expedition Portal" that involves discussing offroad and overland vehicles you'd think people would be more excited.

Merry Christmas to everyone!

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 
Top