What It Feels Like to Die from Heat Stroke

GB_Willys_2014

Active member
What It Feels Like to Die from Heat Stroke

Your head is pounding, your muscles are cramping, and your heart is racing. Then you get dizzy and the vomiting starts. Heatstroke kills thousands of people every year. This is what it feels like—and how to know when you’re in danger.

 

jgaz

Adventurer
Excellent article!
Really shows how a number of little things add up to one big problem.

Excessive alcohol the night before. Combined with something as simple as a late start with little or no breakfast are factors in many, many of the heat related problems we encounter in the Grand Canyon every summer.
 

BritKLR

Explorer
Don't forget about those caffeine packed sport/energy/I'm a rockstar-stud cuz I drink this sh$&@t drinks. We have rescued more people in the mountains due to heatstroke and dehydration and these were the only source of hydration they had/have.
 

GB_Willys_2014

Active member
For many many years now I have worn long sleeves when out in the sun. This is a habit I picked up during my military service, and I continued the practice when I worked in agriculture.

I am firm believer that long sleeves keeps the body cooler by 1) offering sun protection and 2) maintaining a sheen of cooling sweat, that does not dry.

The Outside article caused me to think twice about this long-sleeve-cooling theory because of a reference to sweat evaporation.

I researched the topic a bit, and came across the following article, reinforcing the long-sleeve-cooling theory.

I post it here as another strategy for heat management (yes, I know this blog is sponsored by a clothing manufacturer, with an interest in selling long sleeve summer shirts):

 

shade

Well-known member
Don't forget about those caffeine packed sport/energy/I'm a rockstar-stud cuz I drink this sh$&@t drinks. We have rescued more people in the mountains due to heatstroke and dehydration and these were the only source of hydration they had/have.

For many many years now I have worn long sleeves when out in the sun. This is a habit I picked up during my military service, and I continued the practice when I worked in agriculture.

I am firm believer that long sleeves keeps the body cooler by 1) offering sun protection and 2) maintaining a sheen of cooling sweat, that does not dry.

The Outside article caused me to think twice about this long-sleeve-cooling theory because of a reference to sweat evaporation.

I researched the topic a bit, and came across the following article, reinforcing the long-sleeve-cooling theory.

I post it here as another strategy for heat management (yes, I know this blog is sponsored by a clothing manufacturer, with an interest in selling long sleeve summer shirts):

With the right clothes, I feel perfectly fine in the heat wearing full pants and long sleeves. Though no longer sold, the best sun shirts I have are from Sierra Designs. Long sleeves, made with a tight mesh material that breathes very well, but still offers excellent sun protection. I wish I'd bought a few more when they were selling out.
 
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jgaz

Adventurer
For many many years now I have worn long sleeves when out in the sun. This is a habit I picked up during my military service, and I continued the practice when I worked in agriculture.

I am firm believer that long sleeves keeps the body cooler by 1) offering sun protection and 2) maintaining a sheen of cooling sweat, that does not dry.

The Outside article caused me to think twice about this long-sleeve-cooling theory because of a reference to sweat evaporation.

I researched the topic a bit, and came across the following article, reinforcing the long-sleeve-cooling theory.

I post it here as another strategy for heat management (yes, I know this blog is sponsored by a clothing manufacturer, with an interest in selling long sleeve summer shirts):

At our annual training this year for the NPS preventive search and rescue (PSAR) program we heard a lecture from an NAU Physiological Professor who is also a program volunteer.

In his lecture he said that in our typical Grand Canyon summer climate the solar heat gain on your skin vs the cooling effect of short sleeves begins to favor long sleeves at about 85’ for the average person.

Long sleeves are even more of an advantage if you have a place to get to get your shirt wet.
 

jgaz

Adventurer
When I have the water to spare, I dunk that SD shirt and put it on without ringing it out. In the desert, it's like having a swamp cooler blowing on you.
^^This!!!

When I volunteer at the canyon we generally are hiking out of the canyon about two miles between noon and 1pm.
This is NOT the time of day I plan to hike out if I’m there for my own recreation.

Being able to stop at the mile and a half rest house water faucet and get wet on the way up is one of the treats for working the busy Bright Angel Trail during the summer months. I generally soak the long sleeve sun shirt that I wear under my uniform shirt and I always soak my bandana.
 

luthj

Engineer In Residence
Not to mention skin cancer (and just aging) from UV exposure. There is a reason that desert dwelling peoples have long loose clothing covering most of their bodies. Depending on the humidity, you can get more bang for your buck, sweat wise, by having a layer of loose wicking fabric. Plus light coloring helps with the solar gain.

I carry a pouch of hydration salts (and lots of water) whenever I hike. Never needed the salts myself, but used them several times for others. One event was climbing a mounting in NZ. It was about 23km with ~1.5k ascent. Half the time we were wearing crampons, and it was crazy windy. It was 50F at the start, and 10F at the summit. One tourist (not very experienced), had only 2 liters of water, and had been drinking some the day before. He nearly collapsed from muscle spasms. Likely due to electrolyte imbalance and light dehydration. 15 minutes after drinking 1 liter of water with salts, he was back to okay.

What surprised me was the guides he was with didn't have any salts, and had minimal extra water...
 
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762X39

Explorer
Another vote for long sleeves on shirts. When I hike (year round) my base layer includes a Merino Wool long sleeve t-shirt (knit in Canada and often available at my local Costco, I always pick up a couple when they have them). I also remember my military training, "hydrate or die" and the fact that you could be charged if you let buddy dehydrate. Rule of thumb is bring enough water, don't wait until you are thirsty and keep those sports drinks on the shelf at the store.
 

shade

Well-known member
Not to mention skin cancer (and just aging) from UV exposure. There is a reason that desert dwelling peoples have long loose clothing covering most of their bodies. Depending on the humidity, you can get more bang for your buck, sweat wise, by having a layer of loose wicking fabric. Plus light coloring helps with the solar gain.

I carry a pouch of hydration salts (and lots of water) whenever I hike. Never needed the salts myself, but used them several times for others. One event was climbing a mounting in NZ. It was about 23km with ~1.5k ascent. Half the time we were wearing crampons, and it was crazy windy. It was 50F at the start, and 10F at the summit. One tourist (not very experienced), had only 2 liters of water, and had been drinking some the day before. He nearly collapsed from muscle spasms. Likely due to electrolyte imbalance and light dehydration. 15 minutes after drinking 1 liter of water with salts, he was back to okay.

What surprised me was the guides he was with didn't have any salts, and had minimal extra water...
With New Zealand's mountaineering history, I'm surprised they didn't do better, but the definition of a guide seems to vary widely. Sounds like the tourist bit off more than he could chew. Good thing he had a guide luthj for support.
 

BritKLR

Explorer
...... will be applying some cooling techniques next week while a couple of us explore the RimRocker from Montrose, Co. to Moab UT on motos. We'll be on the road for week, riding and camping each night. 526785Here's this week's forecast!
 
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