What would you replace your LR3/4 with ?

TexasTJ

Climbing Nerd
I tried a TJ for a while, but was very disappointed with the transfer case and fuel tank ground clearance, over-hood visibility, weak axles on non-rubicon, no tall/skinny C load range tires, overly-low ratio rubicon transfer case, and short stamped steel control arms.
I drove a Tj for a decade from 18-28 Years old. Your complants do hold some truth, but when you are driving down the road with the top down and the doors off looking over that sexy a$$ hood, none of that other $h!t matters...IMG_5242.jpg
 

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Just checked out that Ford Everest too; looks really nice! Oh, and imagine that: another diesel option we will never see in the Ford market here! lol
 

Blaise

Well-known member
Because I'm from the land that doesn't get any of the fun stuff (🇺🇸), I had no idea what a Ford Everest was until you made me Google it. They actually look pretty cool! Congrats
We get the Ford Ranger, which is what this is.

Cmon, we do get the fun stuff! And it's 1/2 the price of anywhere else...
 

cornfarmer

Observer
I posted over in the 4Runner section but didn't get much response. A 3rd gen 4Runner ('97) is for sale near me, and I'm a little curious. I had a '95 w/ the 6 cyl. back in the late '90s and remember it being a good vehicle with practically zero issues.

This '97 looks fine/clean cosmetically, but has over 200k on the 2.7 4 cyl. How is the longevity on that motor? I'm thinking it may be cheaper to run (better mileage, doesn't need premium, less pricey maintenance), but if it needs a bunch of deferred repairs then forget it. I don't really mind driving something ~9 years older as long as it's not going to be just another headache.
 

Blaise

Well-known member
It's a car with 200k miles. Of course it's going to need a bunch of deferred repairs... just like any other car with 200k miles.
 

cornfarmer

Observer
I am on the fence about keeping it / moving on. Not really spending time off-road anymore nor anytime soon, so it may be time to switch to something more economical. The LR3 fuel bills are getting kind of old, it needs premium too, and gas here is well over 4 bucks a gal. I do like having 4WD, but my commute is pretty short, plus the Mrs. is going to stop working next year for a while (baby on the way).
 

gatorgrizz27

Active member
I am on the fence about keeping it / moving on. Not really spending time off-road anymore nor anytime soon, so it may be time to switch to something more economical. The LR3 fuel bills are getting kind of old, it needs premium too, and gas here is well over 4 bucks a gal. I do like having 4WD, but my commute is pretty short, plus the Mrs. is going to stop working next year for a while (baby on the way).
I can’t see going to a 10 year older car to pick up 3-4 mpg with a short commute. I drive 50+ miles per day, going from $65/week to $45/week just isn’t significant.

Having a kid on the way is even more reason to keep the LR3 IMO. Significantly better safety, more comfort, HVAC, etc.

The only 2 reasons I can see for making that downgrade would be :

#1 Regularly traveling to remote enough places and having lost confidence in your LR3 after its left you stranded multiple times.

#2 Being fed up with the more intense/expensive maintenance of an LR3, especially if you aren’t willing to work on it yourself and don’t have a reasonable indoendemr mechanic nearby.

Obviously that’s part of the reason for the post, so my solution would be doing more of the work yourself. Yes, parts are harder to get, but I’ve found most things give you extensive warning before they fail completely, and with eBay and Amazon it’s not an issue to order something on a Monday or Tuesday to put on that weekend.

People complain about stuff like the lower control arm bushings, but it’s not as if they just tear one day and leave the vehicle undrivable with a crooked wheel like a broken tie rod end will.
 

cornfarmer

Observer
I should have mentioned in that last post that the older 4Runner is off the table. While it would be a few bucks cheaper to run, it wouldn't be that much of a difference.

I think I already posted in this thread about doing my own work, which I'm usually not afraid to do unless it's something I can't fix due to lack of skill/time/space/tools. I just don't have as much time as I used to, plus I'd rather spend my free time doing other things.

I keep coming back to the idea that maybe I don't need to change a damn thing. The utility, safety, creature comforts, etc. are all there. I'm gonna wash the MF-er this weekend and try and clear up the foggy headlights, it's super dirty. Maybe I'll Plasti-Dip my wheels, lol.
 

Nonimouse

Cynical old bastard
Common sense, with a baby on the way, keep it until your wife is back at work. Hell if child care in the US is as expensive as it is here, keep it until the wife is back at work and the smallest person is in school. Don't make potentially expensive decisions when you are going to be even more worried about potential emergency big spends.

Any pre-owned vehicle has that one big worry - "how good was the maintenance"
 

CaliDisco

New member
Really wanted to be completely in love with the NewDefender but sadly I’m not... will enjoy my LR4 for a while. In a few years after they’ve sorted the thing out then maybe but honestly at this point the next Bronco will be higher on the list!
 

Carson G

Active member
If I got the 4 cylinder gas motor, I'd feel as if I bought the modern day equivalent of a V6 LR3.
We’ve had a V6 LR3 since it was new and it’s been great it’s a perfectly fine engine. It makes decent low end torque so around town it doesn’t feel underpowered or off road and the alternator is mounted high on the engine instead of at the bottom of the engine so it stays out of the mud and water better. And it’s a Ford Ranger engine so parts are dirt cheap and I can get them anywhere. Would I prefer a V8 probably mainly for a little more power and better sound but there is literally nothing wrong with the V6. Shoot it’s about the same power as a Jeep Gladiator which is similar in weight and capacity. On the new Defender I feel like the 4 cylinder would feel like a peppier V8 LR3 as it’s a lighter vehicle with about the same power. And the I6 would feel better than a V8 LR4. Just my opinion.
 

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johnsoax

Adventurer
With the continued saga of the LR3 running lean, I bit the bullet and purchased a 2016 Ford Explorer Platinum. It is interesting to see the same traction control icons. The Explorer goes to my wife, and I will drive the Expedition. The LR3 is regulated to a play thing/backup vehicle at the moment. My eldest gets his leaners permit in November, so we may just hold on to it for him. Time will tell.
 
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With the continued saga of the LR3 running lean, I bit the bullet and purchased a 2016 Ford Explorer Platinum. It is interesting to see the same traction control icons. The Explorer goes to my wife, and I will drive the Expedition. The LR3 is regulated to a play thing/backup vehicle at the moment. My eldest gets his leaners permit in November, so we may just hold on to it for him. Time will tell.
What is your "LEAN" issue?

And I had a 1st year brand new 2013 Explorer Sport but Ford had to buy it back due to significant electrical/software issues which my brother tells me still exist on his 2016 Sport. On that note, I was told that much of the Ford Explorer design came from the Range Rover product line future designs when Ford was still in JLR; not sure how true it is but you are right, there are many many many significantly like designs. I personally loved the Explorer and would still have it if they would have sorted the software.
 
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