What's gonna leave me stranded?

Thrashero

Member
I’m starting to get a little worried about being stranded because the 99 Montero is getting pretty old. It turned 23 this month! I'm trying to figure out maintenance issues that I haven’t addressed and things that could fail while I’m out. I'm also trying to talk myself out of buying something newer.

The Montero is primarily a weekend adventure mobile: family trips, snow, hunting/scouting, getting to trailheads, and occasional trips to the dump or Home Depot with a trailer. I don’t take it out purposely to wheel it but I don’t want a particularly ************ up forest road to stop me. I also go out alone frequently which isn’t ideal but I do take a Garmin Inreach. It’s rust free and I don’t live in a salt state.

I’m probably leaving something out but over the last 4.5 years I’ve done the following:

Fluids: diffs, transfer case, oil changes, brake fluid,
Flushed radiator
Gates Timing belt kit w/ full Aisin water pump and updated crank bolt
Seals: cams front and rear, front crank seal
OEM crank sensor (I melted it trying to get off a stuck crank pulley with a heat gun and a torch)
Accessory belts
OEM alternator
Upper and lower radiator hoses
Spark plugs, spark plug wires, valve cover gasket seals, spark plug seals
Intake manifold gasket
Egr gasket
Shocks all around
Greased front steering
Alarm delete
White ball transfer case shifter
Rear driver’s side brake rotor and brake line
Rear brake pads
31x10.5x15 Falken Wildpeaks on stock rims

I’m sure there is something I should have done during the timing belt work that I didn’t do.The mechanic doing my alignment said the ball joints look good. It clearly needs valve guide seals but that’s a little beyond my ability and time constraints given how long it took me to do the timing belt job. What else should I be worried about?
 
What's the mileage o your 99? On my 98 Montero Sport with 221,xxx miles, I've had a few additional things act up; Ignition Control Module, coil, starter and fuel pump. Of these, the starter and ICM left me stranded. The coil and fuel pump gave me warning signs before failing. The ICM and coils are easy to do.
 

Thrashero

Member
What's the mileage o your 99? On my 98 Montero Sport with 221,xxx miles, I've had a few additional things act up; Ignition Control Module, coil, starter and fuel pump. Of these, the starter and ICM left me stranded. The coil and fuel pump gave me warning signs before failing. The ICM and coils are easy to do.
170k miles
 

PacS14

Adventurer
The price of gas will leave you stranded...lol jk man sounds like you have a squared away ride to do what you normally do, you can carry a spare ICM and spare starter as mentioned above, just make sure you also carry the tools required for replacing them on the go.
 

Toasty

Looking for that thing i just had in my hand...
I'm at about 275k of some pretty hard miles in the same truck, if you're up to date and regular with maintenance I'd say the tires or battery are the most common things to leave you stranded. Keep a basic tool kit and things like hose, tire and wire repair kits along with a few fluids.
 

Mickey Bitsko

Adventurer
You the original owner, you have all the maintenance records, can you afford a 'new ' weekend play vehicle, if you answer no to any of these questions, then, get an estimate from a reputable mechanic and have it checked from stem to stern, including compression test and fluid analysis. Don't stress. It's not brain surgery.

If you want to worry about something worry about any electronics.
 

alanymarce

Well-known member
Battery. Today's batteries last only a few years and can die without warning (they used to last many years and gave signs of impending failure). Our battery (2016 Montero) died on us in central Australia with no warning - fortunately we were able to jump start and get to a battery dealer. If you're far from help you could be stranded.
 

Thrashero

Member
I appreciate the tips, guys. The battery is a simple thing I could do now for piece of mind. I had it test a couple years ago when I thought it was the reason the truck wouldn't start. They said it was fine but that battery is of an unknown age. I'll look into the ICM and starter and doing a field repair vs just preemptively just doing it now. I keep a tool kit but I need to include hose, wire, and tire repair.
 

Mickey Bitsko

Adventurer
I have seen people take everything from extra starters to batteries, hoses, belts.
The most important equipment is to start with making sure your basics are covered, top off oil, it uses a little take a quart or whatever amount you think you will need for said outing. Same with coolant, are your belts good if not, put on a new one don't take the chance Same with air filter etc.
If you're going places that may require hi lift jack or winch, be prepared.
To build your confidence, explore where others frequent and you'll get ideas hands on..have fun with baby steps.
 
Belts and fluids like everyone else said, also if you don't know how to use a multi-meter, learn to and keep one in the vehicle. One thing that is/isn't vehicle related is keeping some food and water in the vehicle. I've been stuck places for entire days without service/help while repairing a vehicle, having the food and water to keep you and your family going will make a big difference.
 

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