where are the Porsche cayenne expo builds?

DrewTheBrave

New member
I've been on the lookout for a Cayenne Diesel with Air Suspension, but they might as well be unicorns. If one had to choose between the air suspension or the Diesel engine, which one would you pick? My off road aspirations are pretty mild, mostly following pretty well traveled dirt paths to camping and hunting spots within Southern California.

I'm leaning towards the air suspension for the adjustable ride height. I think the on- and off-road performance of a Cayenne S on airbags would keep a smile on my face pretty much everywhere but the gas pump...
 

Cayenne-958-TDI

Active member
I've been on the lookout for a Cayenne Diesel with Air Suspension, but they might as well be unicorns. If one had to choose between the air suspension or the Diesel engine, which one would you pick? My off road aspirations are pretty mild, mostly following pretty well traveled dirt paths to camping and hunting spots within Southern California. I'm leaning towards the air suspension for the adjustable ride height. I think the on- and off-road performance of a Cayenne S on airbags would keep a smile on my face pretty much everywhere but the gas pump...
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Our 2013 diesel with air suspension has been off-roading for 113k miles from new in the desert & up to the frozen Arctic Ocean. Have never seen the need for an additional lift kit as we do not rock climb but do go beyond FS roads.
As you are in southern CA, a big determinant for us would be getting a petrol model vs diesel. Reason, you will have some luck getting ULSD fuel on Baja but it is not available in mainland Mexico.
For just North America, it is hard to beat the range and low end torque of a diesel. Would wait on a diesel with air and w/o a pano roof. Our build and some of what we do at the link:
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mhiscox

Expedition Leader
Richard has done lots more with Otis than I ever have with my Cayenne and certainly knows more about this than I do, but I have had good success with my petrol 2012 Cayenne Turbo. Having the Turbo gives you plenty of power and torque (no duh, huh?) but the mpgs are not horrible because the engine through the 8-speed is turning rather slower in a highway cruise, and Turbos (and some others) have 100 liter tanks, so 450-500 mph range is routine. My well-equipped Turbo has the air suspension giving me plenty of clearance and Porsche Torque Vectoring which gives me a locking rear diff to go with the standard locking center diff, but both are probably not mandatory for your situation. Similarly, two of the bigger drawbacks to Cayennes as off-roaders--limited tire size without big/expensive modes and limited underbody protection options--may not strictly be necessary for your travels.

FWIW, I think you're heading a good direction here. My Cayenne with the stock air suspension rides better over washboarded and rutted dirt and gravel better than every other vehicle I've had, including some with highly modified suspensions.
 

DrewTheBrave

New member
Appreciate the feedback! I initially was considering a 4Runner, GX, or LR3/4, then I found this forum and started reading stories about Otis -- that's what really convinced me that the Cayenne was going to be my next vehicle purchase. Coming from a VW GTI, I think the Cayenne will keep my inner hoon satisfied, while still pulling double-duty as a safe family car with some off-road capability.

I'll keep casting my net far and wide for a 958 Diesel on air, but I looked through the interior photos of about 80 CDs listed nationwide on Cargurus to see if any have the air controls, and not a single one did. If I find one in good shape, I may need to act quickly.

I like the thought of the Turbo with the extra standard features and high probability of having nice options, but I understand the intercoolers can interfere with larger diameter tires, which I would like to have the option to fit at some point. The GTS comes standard with air suspension, so that's definitely on my radar as a possibility as well, but don't the GTS and Turbo have lower overhangs? That could be an issue over uneven terrain. Are there many owners taking their GTS off road? I'm getting the sense the S or Diesel would suit me just fine if I can find the options I like, but the GTS is still in consideration.

The Turbo honestly might just have too much power. Anyone ever get a CT and regret it?
 
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mhiscox

Expedition Leader
Just a couple of thoughts from my Turbo 958 experience . . .

You needn't worry in the least about the CTT having too much power, since if you are not trying to make it wail, it's totally a pussycat. The transmission likes to quickly get you into the most economical gear possible, so a lot of your time is spent plodding around in seventh or eighth as docile as can be. Press the throttle hard to get some boost and some downshifts and the situation changes dramatically, but that's entirely up to you. (It is, however, very handy to have the small 50-90 time that quickly and safely gets you past slow traffic on crowded two-lanes.)

The tire situation for Turbos is not good. There are serious body and component clearance issues, but the initial problem is that the smallest diameter wheel that will fit over the Turbo front brake disks is a 19 inch. And the number of suitable true all-terrain tires available in 19s is really small. I ran 255/55R19 DuraTracs and that tire--just a bit over 30" in diameter--was the best I could do. Goodyear has the Adventure All-Terrain in a 255/60R19 and I ran those, too; there were a little over 31 inches and were a wussier tire (which was good thing when on pavement) but the clearance with the front fender was too tight. So by the standards that have taken over herein, you might well eliminate a Turbo for the tire size problem. In reality, if you are on paved, dirt and gravel roads, 30 inch tires are plenty big and give much better handling, ride and fuel economy than shoehorning on bigger ones.

I've actually never analyzed how the front facias of Cayennes compare, but mine is equipped with the front and rear factory skid plates--cleverly bent aluminum pieces that, knowing Porsche engineering, may work better than you'd think they would . . . or maybe not :unsure: --and thus I have decent angles and clearances. I would guess that a non-air Cayenne on 22s is would be pretty suspect.

As often happens here, decisions have to be made between getting the apparently cooler, more trail-oriented truck and suffering the downsides when you are not on a trail or getting the less "built" rig and gaining advantages for the vast majority of the time that you are not trail running. I would propose that a properly-optioned Cayenne, whether diesel or turbo, ranks as a exceptionally good off-pavement truck, but it's probably not amenable to a hard-core trail build at any practical cost.
 

mk216v

Der Chef der Fahrzeuge
Having the same CTT as Mike(well, 'cept mine has upgraded GIAC engine software @ 600bhp, muscular Hanksville exhaust, his old roof rack setup, and his old factory Porsche sliders), I concur with his statements. Love love my CTT, total jeckyll/hyde, but you'd also do well with an S, if you can find one optioned with air susp. Reason we both went Turbo's was the value per dollar, and how outfitted both of our Turbo's are, for a fraction of the new Porsche price (his has special mahogany Yachting interior, mine full carbon fiber and compass/altimeter option, so whether on sea or land, it's always a fun Porsche SUV experience). Doubtful to find an S with air susp AND PTV+ locking rear diff. Or get a coil susp and add the Eurowise lift kit; we've done some of those on 955/957's and they're beasts on 33-35's!
The 958 S would get you smaller brakes like a Diesel has(brakes are still very good), so you could 18s and taller tires, than our Turbo's 19s and 255/55/19 Duratrac's. GTS do have some painted lower cladding so beware of that for off-pavement.

And BTW, we also came from VW's(loooong ago), have Rovers, etc. A 958 Cayenne is much more reliable than the Rover, especially an LR4, although a well-cared for LR3 can be very reliable if maintenance/repairs haven't been deferred. 4Runner; totally opposite driving experience than a Cayenne. GX, Mike has had many Lexi; nice and reliable, but still no Cayenne experience. You could also look at the cousin the Touareg; the gen3 diesel's can be had for a screaming deal (seen many as low as $10-12k, 70k on the clock, clean as a whistle).
 
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beef tits

Well-known member
why aren't there any Porsche cayenne builds? I know there no g500 but for 10K less money on average I am really considering one for a base rig to build. there seems to some nice stock attributes for a expo rig.

opinions?
:bowdown:

I can't fathom wanting to take a Porsche anywhere for an extended period of time where durability, reliability and ease of repair were a concern. I imagine a lot of other folks would have the same, very reasonable concern.

It would make a great mall crawler though.
 

mrk_d

New member

Unicorn diesel + air suspension for sale - the seller makes no note of the suspension but combing through the photos reveals the selector. No relation to seller and not in a position to buy right now, but wanted to share.

Screen Shot 2021-05-20 at 7.30.07 PM.png

Screen Shot 2021-05-20 at 7.30.20 PM.png
 

Scramblin_Jim

New member
I can't fathom wanting to take a Porsche anywhere for an extended period of time where durability, reliability and ease of repair were a concern. I imagine a lot of other folks would have the same, very reasonable concern.

It would make a great mall crawler though.
What facts are you using to base your durability and reliability concerns on? How can you pass judgement without owning a Cayenne? In your world, everyone should own brand "X" because you own one!

I owned a 2010 JK Unlimited Rubicon for 6 years from new and had more repairs over the 60K miles I put on it then I have had on my 2015 diesel Cayenne which now has 45K on it over the 3 years I've owned it. The build quality of the Porsche is far superior to the Jeep. The ride comfort of the Jeep is rough and at the end of the day offroading your beat. Dust blows in through the A/C vents after being on a dirt road for miles, then stop and restart the vehicles A/C. There is no headliner in the JK so the heat just pours in through it (not good in Phoenix in summer), having to put in a Hotheads headline. I had to replace the front shocks after 12K miles. I had to modify the cheap front plastic bumper because it contacted a tree during a muddy stream crossing. What I spent in modifications on the JK placed the total cost of the Jeep on par with the cost of the Cayenne when I purchased it new! I use both vehicles for overlanding and enjoy the power and fuel milage far more then the lost capabilities which are really never needed. The JK got 18 mpg while the Cayenne gets 30 mpg over the same road trip. In town the Jeep got 14 mpg while the Cayenne gets 17 when I don't keep my foot out of the accelerator, otherwise 25 mpg. I've towed a offroad teardrop trailer with the Cayenne and didn't even know it was there. I towed a M416 offroad trailer with the JK and you can feel the underpowered minivan engine labor. And finally, I get far more comments on how nice my Porsche is verses the Jeep.

And now, my Cayenne build only consists of swapping out my tires/rims from the stock 19" $2000 rims to LT255/55R18 BFG K02's on gen 1 Cayenne rims. I regularly use the Porsche to travel a 15 mile one-way gravel road to where I shoot out in the desert, traveling up to 50 mph to smooth out the washboard road. I travel many FS roads to hiking trails and camping with the teardrop offroad trailer down the NE AZ forests roads. I have great confidence in the vehicle.
 

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